California

Video catches man shoving 14-year-old onto LA train tracks. Suspect died soon after, cops say

Los Angeles man randomly pushes 14-year-old onto train tracks

A homeless Los Angeles man pushed a teen boy onto red line train tracks in December 2018, then ran out of the Pershing Square station and attacked construction workers before being detained and transported to a hospital where he died.
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A homeless Los Angeles man pushed a teen boy onto red line train tracks in December 2018, then ran out of the Pershing Square station and attacked construction workers before being detained and transported to a hospital where he died.

Los Angeles police released footage on Saturday that shows a man tackling a 14-year-old boy on a subway platform.

Both the man and his teen victim ended up falling onto the Pershing Square station red line train tracks downtown, where they appeared to fight each other Dec. 19 around 9:30 a.m., until bystanders helped pull the boy to safety, video shows.

The man climbed back onto the platform himself, Lt. Kevin Brawner said. During the fight, a train was less than a minute from pulling up to the station. The man quickly got into another fight, was arrested and hospitalized.

But authorities still aren’t sure why the suspected attacker — Husie Outing III, a 47-year-old homeless man — died within hours at a nearby hospital, police said. Los Angeles County medical examiners did a post-mortem examination on Dec. 22, but Outing’s cause of death won’t be determined until a toxicology report comes back, according to police.

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Husie Outing III, 47 LAPD

Minutes after the below-ground incident, Outing got into a fight with a crew of construction workers on the street above the station, injuring at least one, police said. Outing was caught on surveillance video scaling the steps from the station to street, Brawner said.

Video from the above-ground scene, which police posted on YouTube, shows a construction worker holding Outing down on the ground until police got to the scene. Bystanders in the recording speculated that Outing was on drugs.

“He’s on something, brother,” one person told arriving police officers.

After police drove up, the construction workers backed off and let officers handle Outing, who was still spread on the ground, video shows. Outing appeared not to be talking to the officers.

“Listen to me: If you freakin’ move, I’m going to tase you,” one officer told Outing, video shows. “Do you understand me?”

An officer instructed Outing to put his arms out so he could be handcuffed. But officers continued to struggle to handcuff Outing, and observed that “he’s strong.”

“Don’t tense up,” one officer instructed Outing in the video. “Release your left arm.”

Once Outing was handcuffed, the officers struggled to move him, video shows. Officers called for paramedics to come help and reported that Outing was “under the influence of an unknown narcotic” and was injured on his head and arms.

More emergency responders arrived, and Outing was put on a stretcher before going to the hospital, where he died about an hour later “for unknown reasons,” Brawner said.

Firefighters treated the 14-year-old victim for minor injuries at the scene, police said. A construction worker who struggled with Outing had cuts on his head, face and legs, and later got medical treatment on his own.

On Dec. 19, Detective Meghan Aguilar said the officers only used “minor” force, KTLA reports: “Minor use of force would be something not lethal, no beanbag, no Taser. Sometimes it’s just a firm grip on a body part,” Aguilar said.

Authorities will look at the autopsy and other evidence to make sure the officers involved used force appropriately during their encounter with Outing, police spokesman Josh Rubenstein said.

NBC reported in December that Outing died of a heart attack.

Police said Outing had not had contact with police mental health evaluators before, but did have a criminal record, including arrests for assault with a deadly weapon, battery, voluntary manslaughter, drug possession and resisting arrest, police said.

Locals who spoke to KTLA in December said the attack worried them — especially after another homeless man pushed a stranger into the path of a truck just days earlier, seriously injuring the man.

“It’s not unique to Los Angeles, but it happens to be particularly out of control here,” Todd Larew, who works nearby, told KTLA. “It’s something we should all be concerned about.”

Witnessing a crime and reporting it can be just as frightening as being the victim of a crime. Here’s what you should do if you witness illegal activity.

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