Fires

Yolo, Solano and Bay Area issue air quality warning as wind carries County Fire smoke

County Fire burns in Yolo County

The Yolo blaze, called the County Fire (also called Guinda Fire), broke out in wildlands south of Guinda, a census-designated place with a population of 254 on Saturday, June, 30, 2018.
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The Yolo blaze, called the County Fire (also called Guinda Fire), broke out in wildlands south of Guinda, a census-designated place with a population of 254 on Saturday, June, 30, 2018.

Both the Yolo-Solano and Bay Area air quality management districts have issued an air quality warning for Sunday after smoke from the County Fire has blown throughout several parts of Northern California.

The County Fire, originally dubbed the Guinda Fire, had reached 22,000 acres as of 1:27 p.m. Sunday. The fire was sparked on Saturday afternoon and has exploded in size.

Yolo-Solano Air Quality Management District covers Yolo County and the northeast portion of Solano County, which includes Vacaville and Dixon.

Bay Area Air Quality Management District includes the nine counties surrounding the San Francisco Bay, which includes Contra Costa, Marin, Napa and southern Sonoma counties.

"Prevailing northerly winds are blowing narrow bands of smoke and ash into the Bay Area. Fog is largely preventing the smoke from reaching the ground level in parts of the Bay Area," according to the Bay Area Air Quality Management District. "Due to active wildfires and changing wind patterns, air quality throughout the Bay Area could continue to be impacted tomorrow."

The National Weather Service has issued a red flag warning extending through Sunday evening, and smoke will continue to be carried through Northern California.

In order to stay safe during this air quality warning, the Yolo-Solano Air Quality Management District has issued the following tips:

  • Reduce outdoor physical activity, as exercise increases your body's air intake.
  • Reduce exposure to smoke. Those who are most at risk for inhalation damages include pregnant women, children, the elderly, and people who may suffer from heart and lung problems.
  • Close all windows, turn on the air conditioner and stay indoors. If travel by car is necessary, keep windows and air vents closed.

"Wildfire smoke is made up of a complex mixture of gases and fine particles when wood and other organic materials are burning that can penetrate deep into the lungs causing a range of health issues from coughing and trouble breathing to headaches and chest pain," a news release by the Yolo-Solano Air Quality Management District said.

A no-burn day has been issued in Sutter and Yuba counties due to fire danger.

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