Fires

Heavy rain halted Camp Fire cleanup. Now crews are set to tackle the tons of debris.

‘Chimney tipping’ marks the beginning of cleanup in Paradise

The cleanup of Paradise moves to the next phase as workers begin knocking down the chimneys throughout the city on Wednesday, Jan. 30, 2019.
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The cleanup of Paradise moves to the next phase as workers begin knocking down the chimneys throughout the city on Wednesday, Jan. 30, 2019.

California cleanup officials say they will resume wildfire debris removal efforts in the rain-soaked hills of Butte County next week after two weeks of demobilization as crews waited out unsafe winter conditions.

Some 300 workers were forced to sit idle starting March 4 as heavy rain and snowstorms saturated the hillsides burned by the Camp Fire, making properties and roads too dangerous for work, and making debris too wet to be accepted by landfills.

With drier weather, work will resume Monday, CalRecycle officials said.

As many as 1,000 truckloads of material are expected to be trucked daily off of properties in Paradise, Concow, Magalia and surrounding hillsides, taken down narrow mountain roads to Northern California landfills.

CalRecycle spokesman Lance Klug said officials had calculated the potential for weather-related work stoppages into their schedules. The government-sponsored cleanup, involving 11,000 properties, is expected to take a year. So far, 287 properties have been cleaned completely.

Officials in the town of Paradise have set a series of meetings next week for residence to discuss rebuilding efforts.

Steve Lambert, chairman of the Butte County board of supervisors, talks to the Sacramento Valley Water organization about how recovery is going in Paradise after the Camp Fire.

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