Fires

Cal Fire cites fire danger as it suspends burn permits

Increasingly dangerous fire conditions in Northern California prompted CalFire to suspend burn permits in several counties on Wednesday, June 22, 2016.
Increasingly dangerous fire conditions in Northern California prompted CalFire to suspend burn permits in several counties on Wednesday, June 22, 2016.

Citing continuing drought conditions and increased fire danger, the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection announced the suspension of burn permits in Sacramento, El Dorado, Amador and Alpine counties.

The suspension, which will take effect Monday, bans all residential outdoor burning of landscape debris like branches and leaves.

“Conditions throughout our region have become such that it is no longer safe for the public to perform residential burning,” Mike Kaslin, Cal Fire’s Amador-El Dorado Unit chief, said in a written statement. “We need the public to be extra diligent and perform defensible space clearances early in the morning and with the right tools.”

Since Jan. 1, Cal Fire and firefighters statewide have responded to more than 1,500 wildfires, according to a Cal Fire news release. In the Amador-El Dorado Unit, firefighters have responded to 59 wildfires.

Cal Fire is asking residents to be prepared for wildfires by maintaining at least 100 feet of defensible space around each home.

Fire officials offer several tips for preparing homes and property:

▪ Clear all dead and or dying vegetation 100 feet from around all structures.

▪ Landscape with fire-resistant, drought-tolerant plants.

▪ Find alternative ways to dispose of landscape debris, such as chipping or hauling it to a biomass energy facility.

Cal Fire may issue restricted temporary burning permits if there is an essential reason to public health and safety. Agriculture, land management, fire training and other industrial-type burning may proceed if a Cal Fire official inspects the burn site and issues a special permit.

Suspension of burn permits for residential landscape debris does not apply to campfires within organized campgrounds or on private property. A campfire may be permitted if it is maintained in a manner that prevents it from spreading to the wildland. A campfire permit can be obtained at local fire stations and online at PreventWildfireCA.org.

For more information on how to create defensible space and tips to prevent wildfires see Cal Fire’s Ready for Wildfire website, www.ReadyForWildfire.org.

Cathy Locke: 916-321-5287, @lockecathy

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