Weather

UPDATE: Debris flow warning lifted in burned areas of Lake, Yolo counties

Areas denuded of vegetation by summer wildfires, such as stretches of land scorched by the Rocky fire, are under threat of mudslides and flooding from the Pacific storm that hit Northern California Sunday and Monday.
Areas denuded of vegetation by summer wildfires, such as stretches of land scorched by the Rocky fire, are under threat of mudslides and flooding from the Pacific storm that hit Northern California Sunday and Monday. AP

The National Weather Service announced shortly after 6 p.m. Monday that the threat of debris flows in areas affected by the Rocky, Jerusalem and Valley fires had ended.

Flash flood warnings for portions of Colusa, Lake and Yolo counties were issued early Monday afternoon.

As of about 1:30 p.m., Doppler radar indicated heavy rain across the Rocky and Jerusalem fire burn area and more than a half-inch of rain had fallen in the previous 30 minutes, according to the Weather Service. The rains raised concerns about potential debris flows, consisting of rock, mud, vegetation and other loose materials.

Locations threatened by potential flooding included Middletown, Loch Lomond, Ettawa Springs, Seigler Springs, Anderson Springs, Adams, Whispering Pines, Hobergs, Forest Lake, Hidden Valley Lake, Lower Lake and Cobb.

Officials warned people to move away from recently burned areas, and motorists were advised to use caution and not to try to cross flooded roadways or creeks.

Cathy Locke: 916-321-5287, @lockecathy

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