Weather

Sacramento River flows over weir into Yolo Bypass

A yard gate begins to disappear as the Sacramento River continues to rise out on Garden Highway near Verona.
A yard gate begins to disappear as the Sacramento River continues to rise out on Garden Highway near Verona. smorrow@sacbee.com

Water from the rain-swollen Sacramento River began flowing over the Fremont Weir and into the Yolo Bypass on Saturday morning, according to monitors at the California Nevada River Forecast Center, part of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

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The forecast center chart showed the river topping the Fremont Weir crest elevation of 33.5 feet for the first time in more than three years. The National Weather Service said its monitors likewise showed Sacramento River waters flowing over the weir early Saturday.

The Yolo Bypass, an expanse of farmland and natural habitat that stretches from Sacramento to Davis, was created a century ago to divert floods from Sacramento. When the river swells in wet winters, it flows over the weir, enabling water to flow freely into the 58,000-acre bypass, which is farmed the rest of the year.

The Fremont Weir is a nearly 2-mile-long concrete structure located about 8 miles northeast of Woodland. The weir was constructed in the 1920s to divert floodwater away from the Sacramento metro area.

Mark Glover: 916-321-1184, @markhglover

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