Opinion

Former FBI Director James B. Comey’s extraordinary testimony

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Jack Ohman serves up a tasty Comey-Trump dinner meeting. Check out the cartoon fare here.

Our take

Editorials

California’s senators stood out during the Comey hearing, for different reasons: Dianne Feinstein used her experience to elicit the quote of the hearing. Kamala Harris introduced herself to a worldwide audience as a former prosecutor and attorney general.

Columns

Marcos Breton: Think retrying the man who hit former Sacramento Mayor Kevin Johnson in the face with a pie is a waste of taxpayer money? You’re wrong and here’s why.

Erwin Chemerinsky: The only conclusion from former FBI Director James Comey’s dramatic testimony is that President Donald Trump and his team obstructed justice. But if the Republicans who control Congress won’t hold Trump to account, who will?

Kate Karpilow: California is essentially now a one-party state – with a Democratic governor who signed the original comparable worth bill in 1981 and supermajorities of Democrats in both branches of the legislature. All of this political firepower could be used to make California a model employer – and finally deliver on its equal pay promise.

Op-Eds

Matt Powers: Whoever is chosen as the next chief of the Sacramento Police Department needs an assistant chief as second-in-command.

Takes on Comey hearing

Charlotte Observer: Neither a threat from Russia, nor the blatant abuse of presidential power James Comey described Thursday before a Senate committee has been enough to convince the majority of Republicans to place country over party.

LA Times: Even though his prepared statement had been released and read by millions of Americans a day earlier, former FBI Director James B. Comey’s testimony Thursday before the Senate Intelligence Committee was sensational, riveting and sickening.

David French, National Review: There is much to unpack in former FBI director James Comey’s almost three hours of live testimony today, but my summary is rather simple. The “big” conspiracy theory that’s circulating online — that Trump and his team colluded with the Russians, and Trump fired Comey because he was getting close to the truth — took some serious body blows. The smaller scandal (compared to active collusion with the Russians) — that Trump either abused his power or potentially obstructed justice when he fired James Comey — got a modest boost.

Michael Gerson: President Trump has a morality rooted in relationships and defines character with personal loyalty. James Comey has a morality of norms and defines character as obedience to a code of rules.

Ruben Navarrette: When James Comey was invited to dinner at the White House, the person who showed up wasn’t Eliot Ness. It was Barney Fife.

Eugene Robinson: Topics James Comey scrupulously avoided may give a hint of where the investigation is headed, like a Russian bank and Attorney General Jeff Sessions.

Charles M. Blow: President Donald Trump’s comments as alleged in the James Comey statement make Trump sound more like a mob boss than the president of a democracy.

Dana Milbank: The juxtaposition between James Comey’s gripping account and the Trump administration officials’ refusal to answer questions did no credit to the embattled president.

Their take

San Francisco Chronicle: It’s great that Google wants to bring 20,000 jobs to San Jose. But where are the workers supposed to live? If Google — or any other major company — wants to build a campus of this size anywhere in the Bay Area, it needs to figure out ways to account for its housing impact.

Mercury News: The California Supreme Court has to strike down key elements of Proposition 66 if it wants to ensure that justice prevails on death penalty cases.

Kansas City Star: Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach has entered the 2018 governor’s race. While it’s too early for endorsements, the announcement provides an opportunity to think about the challenges awaiting the next governor, and how best to address them.

Raleigh News & Observer: North Carolina Gov. Roy Cooper is right to call a special session for legislators to redraw legislative district maps, and the Republicans’ reasons for rejecting him are outrageous.

Lexington Herald Leader: A discussion of how to ensure that young Kentuckians learn to read before they leave third grade was overshadowed Wednesday by political fallout from Kentucky Gov. Matt Bevin’s latest power grab.

Syndicates’ take

Charles Krauthammer: You can’t govern by tweet. Donald Trump sees them as a direct, “unfiltered” conduit to the public. What he doesn’t quite understand is that for anyone they are a direct conduit from the unfiltered id.

Trudy Rubin: Iraqis who helped Americans deserve better than this. It took a lot to reverse the cruel injustice the U.S. bureaucracy perpetrated on the Albaiedhani family, whose sons worked as interpreters for the U.S. Army.

Gail Collins: The Trump administration would prefer that we all concentrate on the president’s plans for improving the nation’s roads and bridges.

Mailbag

“Communist China is just jerking the world’s and Jerry Brown’s chain.” Frank Isaac, Roseville

And finally,

The great Robin Abcarian of the LA Times: Is there a working woman alive who cannot identify with poor James Comey right now? The former FBI director’s boss tried to seduce him. When the seduction failed, his boss fired him. And then called him “crazy, a real nut job.”

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