Opinion

Police shootings + single payer + sanctuary state + VA secretary

Welcome to The Take, your opinion-politics newsletter, produced by The Sacramento Bee’s editorial board. Please sign up for it here and tell your friends.

Our take

Jack Ohman watches the Trump legal team take shape. See the re-run here.

Columns

Erika D. Smith: Instead of giving people false hope that Sacramento County District Attorney Anne Marie Schubert will file charges in the police shooting of Stephon Clark, why don’t we talk about how to change California’s laws so it's easier to hold officers accountable for their actions? Because it's possible. Read more.

Dan Walters, CALMatters: It would be fair to assume that relatively few of the California voters who passed Proposition 13 overwhelmingly 40 years ago will still be voting this year. Would today’s voters be willing to make a major change in the state’s iconic property-tax limitation? They may get the opportunity in a proposed November ballot measure that would remove Proposition 13’s limits from commercial sites, raising property taxes on them by $6 billion to $10 billion a year but not on homeowners. Read more.

Op-eds

Theodore M. Mazer: The California Medical Association supports key parts of legislation, which unlike a single-payer plan, includes credible and far-reaching provisions to reduce costs, provide greater transparency and increase access to health care. Read more.

Frank Mecca: With enough funding, Adult Protective Services could make timely interventions to prevent homelessness among California’s elderly. Read more.

California Forum

Mark Klaas: California bail reform bill may be trendy, but it would hurt victims’ rights. Read more.

Takes on police shootings

Solomon Jones, Philadelphia Daily News: In one ruling after another, in one jurisdiction after another, in one case after another, America has taken my face in its hands, looked me squarely in the eye, and screamed at the top of its lungs that black lives have no value. The latest message was delivered Tuesday. That’s when Louisiana Attorney General Jeff Landry announced the decision not to indict Baton Rouge police officers in the 2016 shooting death of Alton Sterling. Read more.

San Diego Union-Tribune editorial board: The Stephon Clark shooting has lessons for all police agencies, not just police in Sacramento. Amid a wave of angry protests, law enforcement officials and community leaders in Sacramento pleaded for time and patience Tuesday as multiple investigations are being launched into last week’s fatal shooting of an unarmed black man in the backyard of his grandparents’ house, where he lived. Time? Clark, only 22, had mere seconds to live when two police officers responding to a report of someone smashing car windows found him in his backyard and fired 20 shots at him. Read more.

Their take

Fresno Bee: “The only thing more tragic than a death…is a death that could have been prevented.” This powerful thought ends a presentation called “Stop the Bleed” by Dr. Larry Sue, faculty member in the University of California, San Francisco Fresno’s Department of Surgery. The UCSF Fresno and Community Regional Medical Center Trauma Program have offered more than 70 classes and trained more than 1,800 people to jump in and save us if we get hurt and are (gasp) bleeding. Maybe you should become a life-saver, too. Read more.

Los Angeles Times: Many people might be flattered to be portrayed by Catherine Zeta-Jones in a TV miniseries. Oscar-winning actress Olivia de Havilland, however, was not. She sued, claiming that “Feud” violated what’s known as her right of publicity – the control that California state law gives people over the use of their name, image and voice. Last September a California Superior Court judge denied FX’s motion to dismiss De Havilland’s claims, in part because “Feud” had sought to portray her accurately. That would effectively give historical figures (and their heirs) veto power over movies, TV shows, books and other creative works. Happily, the 2nd District Court of Appeal in Los Angeles ruled Monday that such works are protected by the 1st Amendment. Read more.

Orange County Register: Sometimes the free-speech arguments for supporting someone who has said something appalling are certainly makeable, and at the same time people of good sense are glad they are not the ones who have to make them. Of course the unthoughtful, unkind utterances of disgraced and now fired teacher Gregory Salcido about the supposed lack of high intellect he sees in young people who want to enter our country’s armed forces are of a different kind than other types of American free speech because the words were spoken in a classroom. Read more.

Syndicates’ take

Gail Collins, New York Times: President Trump demanded security for Dreamers after killing the DACA protection program in the first place. This sort of total transformation happens a lot in this White House. I feel the best explanation is that our president is occasionally taken over by a benevolent alien entity who changes his entire personality. Read more.

E.J. Dionne Jr., Washington Post: The most sophisticated political cheating isn’t ballot-box stuffing but the use of indirect means by those in authority to perpetuate themselves in office. For instance, the Trump administration moved to add to the 2020 census a query about a respondent’s citizenship status. Read more.

Thomas L. Friedman, New York Times: Welcome to the second inning of one of the world’s great technological leaps, the implications of which we’re just beginning to understand. The cool self-driving car killed a pedestrian; the cool Facebook platform enabled Russian troll farms to divide us and inject fake news into our public life. Read more.

Nicholas Kristof, New York Times: The U.S. has invested enormously in the military toolbox to reshape the world, but it has systematically underinvested in the education toolbox. The trade-offs are substantial: For the cost of deploying one U.S. soldier abroad for a year, we can start at least 20 schools. Read more.

Tweets of the day

<blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"><p lang="en" dir="ltr">My Administration stands in solidarity with the brave citizens in Orange County defending their rights against California&#39;s illegal and unconstitutional Sanctuary policies. California&#39;s Sanctuary laws....</p>&mdash; Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) <a href="https://twitter.com/realDonaldTrump/status/979030033149972480?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">March 28, 2018</a></blockquote>

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<blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"><p lang="en" dir="ltr">....release known dangerous criminals into communities across the State. All citizens have the right to be protected by Federal law and strong borders.</p>&mdash; Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) <a href="https://twitter.com/realDonaldTrump/status/979030109104562176?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">March 28, 2018</a></blockquote>

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<blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"><p lang="en" dir="ltr">It is almost as shocking that Ronny Jackson accepted Trump&#39;s nomination as VA Secretary, full well knowing he&#39;s unqualified for the position. <br><br>This is completely bonkers, and as a military veteran who receives care at my VA facility regularly, it concerns me deeply.</p>&mdash; Charlotte Clymer️‍ (@cmclymer) <a href="https://twitter.com/cmclymer/status/979113533748252673?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">March 28, 2018</a></blockquote>

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<blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"><p lang="en" dir="ltr">Trump replaces Veterans Affairs Secretary David Shulkin with Ronny Jackson, Trump’s personal physician. <br><br>In other news, Transportation Secretary Chao is being replaced with an Uber driver and Agriculture Secretary Purdue with steak and ketchup.</p>&mdash; Eugene Gu, MD (@eugenegu) <a href="https://twitter.com/eugenegu/status/979115773942624256?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">March 28, 2018</a></blockquote>

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