Letters to the Editor

Embarrassed by the California Legislature

Assembly Speaker Anthony Rendon, D-Paramount, center, discusses a pair of proposed measures to protect immigrants, during a news conference in Sacramento on Monday. The lawmakers urged President-elect Donald Trump to refrain from pursuing mass deportations and introduced legislation to fund immigration lawyers and help public defenders protect the state’s immigrants.
Assembly Speaker Anthony Rendon, D-Paramount, center, discusses a pair of proposed measures to protect immigrants, during a news conference in Sacramento on Monday. The lawmakers urged President-elect Donald Trump to refrain from pursuing mass deportations and introduced legislation to fund immigration lawyers and help public defenders protect the state’s immigrants. The Associated Press

Legislators should support president

Re “Legislators rip Trump, but Brown bides time” (Page 1A, Dec. 6): As a conservative, I am embarrassed to be a Californian. This is not new for me, but it comes to the forefront every time I see headlines like this.

Before the election, I think everyone, conservatives included, were concerned because of the character of both candidates. But the American way is to elect a president in the way we did, and it’s Donald Trump. All this political posturing only makes California’s Legislature look immature and foolish.

Don’t forget we have checks and balances in government. Trump will not become a dictator. So far he seems fairly level-headed in his Cabinet choices. He has spoken only of deporting criminal illegal aliens, just as President Barack Obama has been doing in record numbers.

These chest pounding legislators need to stand down and respect the office of the presidency until it is no longer deserved. Trump isn’t even in office yet.

Dave Putman,

Citrus Heights

This is not my state Legislature

Re “California lawmakers to Trump: ‘if you want to get to (immigrants), you have to go through us’ ” (Sacbee, Dec. 5): The state Legislature thinks it has the authority to defy federal law and make their own laws. These are the same people who went ballistic when Arizona decided to enforce existing federal immigration law.

Why is it the politics of hatred and exclusion when our country wants to enforce existing federal law? And to add insult to injury, the state wants to “fund legal services for immigrants facing deportation.” Isn’t it wonderful living in a one-party state?

William Sullivan,

Carmichael

Need to exercise state’s rights

The election of Donald Trump has dismayed many people, but it also provides California with a unique opportunity. For years the mantra of conservatives has been that the federal government is the problem in that it is a bully which infringes on states’ rights. Now is the time to make conservatives honor this doctrine.

Under the Trump administration, the federal government could be the problem, and the bullying has already begun. Trump has threatened to withhold federal funding to sanctuary cities. How should California and other Pacific states respond? We collect a proportion of federal taxes and send these funds to Washington. California should simply refuse to send this money to the federal government, and use it instead to make up for the funds that Trump withholds. In short, we should boldly exert our state’s rights.

John Rogan,

Tillamook, Ore.

Bring on CHP enforcement

Re “ ‘Left-lane loons’ and other capital freeway agitators” (Page 2A, Back-seat driver, Dec. 5): It was very gratifying to read about planned CHP enforcement of aggressive driving on the capital region freeways. All too often, the recklessness of tailgating and careless lane changing are catastrophes waiting to happen, along with excessive speed.

Such “left-lane loons” who stay at speeds between 65 and 70 mph have every right to be there. However, a tailgater always has different ideas. Whatever became of the idea of one car length for every 10 mph?

For now, bring on the aggressive CHP enforcement as soon as possible. Most of us want to get where we are going and are not tired of living yet.

Jerry Marr, Davis

Tackle issue of aggressive driving

The problem with traffic and aggressive driving is not slow driving. The most troublesome and most dangerous is aggressive driving combined with speeding.

Slow driving on the freeway may cause other drivers to become aggressive, but there are more consequences from fast driving. Driving too slow should not be singled out as the lone source of traffic congestion. Aggressive driving includes unsafe and continuous lane changes and tailgating, which are more dangerous and exhibit more bad behavior of drivers than driving too slow.

It would be more effective for the California Highway Patrol to tackle the issue of aggressive driving directly rather than finding reasons as to why aggressive driving exists.

Alex Kwong, Sacramento

A clear violation of native rights

I am in solidarity with the Standing Rock water protectors. It’s hard to believe that native people still face such treatment in the U.S. This was their home before anyone else “discovered” it. It’s a disgrace that the Sioux are fighting for the land that rightfully belongs to them.

Gabriella Jackson-Crowell, Sacramento

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