Letters to the Editor

Letters: On DeVos, McClintock, guns, PG&E, visas and water

National Rifle Association Executive Vice President and Chief Executive Officer Wayne LaPierre, at right, listens as President Donald Trump speaks in the White House. More research could reduce U.S. firearms fatalities, a letter writer suggests.
National Rifle Association Executive Vice President and Chief Executive Officer Wayne LaPierre, at right, listens as President Donald Trump speaks in the White House. More research could reduce U.S. firearms fatalities, a letter writer suggests. The Associated Press

More female senators needed

Re “Dems muster 50 ‘no’ votes, but DeVos still wins confirmation” (Page 1A, Feb. 8): Kudos to Sens. Collins and Murkowski for caring more about the children in their respective states than about getting re-elected. Shining examples for electing more women, instead of gutless men.

Gayle Fishkin, Antelope

It’s about the degree of need

Re “McClintock exits with police escort after raucous town hall meeting in Roseville” (Local, Feb. 5): Rep. Tom McClintock said those complaining over the imminent repeal of ACA, the blocking of refugee immigration and decreasing of welfare support should restrain themselves as his supporters did eight years ago against President Barack Obama’s policies.

What did the Obama administration initiate? The ACA and the banking reforms. What was the level of “pain” the McClintock supporters felt then? Less in their pockets and a slight decrease in their quality of life?

The Trump orders directly affects the most basic factors of human existence: life, safety and essential medical needs. Curtailing these via executive order is tantamount to ordering death sentences to those affected. The degree of harm here is so much greater than the discontent of eight years ago. Mr. McClintock, please re-examine your comparisons.

Yin Yeh, Davis

Why gun research matters

Re “Using science to inform gun control” (Editorial, Feb. 7): This is to thank The Bee and the brave UC Davis Violence Prevention Research Program for showing us the clear connections between alcohol abuse and gun crimes. This research could prevent your son or daughter from becoming the victim of a bullet-related injury or, worse, a murder. This letter is written in remembrance of James, my son, who was murdered by firearm 11 years, one month, and five days ago.

Barbara Ramirez, Sacramento

PG&E bills are chilling

Re “Higher rates, cold winter push PG&E bills to surprising levels” (Page 3A, Feb. 6): PG&E would have us believe its rates for natural gas are a bargain. The company’s spokesperson attempts to prove that by stating their customers pay an average of $54.33 per month for natural gas compared to $59.17 for residential usage nationwide.

That comparison only holds water if the climate nationwide were comparable to California’s. Last time I checked, most regions have much colder and significantly longer winters than we experience here. The average bill nationally should be much higher than California’s. PG&E’s rationale is a bunch of hot air.

Wes Hill, Carmichael

Tech doesn’t hire American

Re “Trump’s epic fail on high tech” (Editorial, Feb. 3): This editorial parrots Bay Area CEOs who have long conspired to spread misinformation to import foreigners who work cheap, to hold down salaries of Americans.

Locally, you might inquire at Intel-Folsom how many U.S. citizens have applied for jobs versus how many got interviews and offers. An engineer at my company was laid off and hasn’t gotten even an interview in over two years, despite applying all over the Bay Area and Sacramento regions. Another is an expert at chip design, yet has been unemployed for years.

William Murray Grissom, Sacramento

Fake emergency, fake drought

Re “State should let emergency drought regulations expire,” (Viewpoints, Feb. 8): Thanks to Roseville Mayor Susan Rohan for calling out state water regulators for ignoring facts and extending the “drought emergency.” Our region has perhaps the most to lose in California from ongoing, unnecessary water conservation rules.

Access to abundant water supplies is one of our strategic advantages. It allows our communities to develop and our local economy to grow. State water regulators are taking this strategic strength away by forcing our communities to live as if we are in an ongoing drought.

Yes, our region needs to use water efficiently, which we do. We need to cut back when there is less water available during actual droughts, which we did and we will again. Instead of extending the current drought, however, state regulators should be focused on preparation and efficient water use.

Brian Larson, Roseville

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