Letters to the Editor

Timely acts of kindness, a specious debate over levees and Delta tunnels

Chris McCarty and Mike Taylor help carry Quintin Sanders, who has cerebral palsy, off a rescue boat in the north end of Beaumont, Texas. McCarty came from Lufkin, Texas, to help rescue people from flooding due to Tropical Storm Harvey. For many people in the Houston area, the real takeaway from Harvey has not been misery, but kindness.
Chris McCarty and Mike Taylor help carry Quintin Sanders, who has cerebral palsy, off a rescue boat in the north end of Beaumont, Texas. McCarty came from Lufkin, Texas, to help rescue people from flooding due to Tropical Storm Harvey. For many people in the Houston area, the real takeaway from Harvey has not been misery, but kindness. AP

Restoring hope

Re “Take Two: Thoughts, prayers, rescues, attacks and apologies” (sacbee,.com, Sept. 3): These days there is a surfeit of things to worry about. Regardless of who we are, where we live, whom we love or what we believe, we can all rest assured that this life presents plenty of challenges. After the events of Charlottesville, I had a burgeoning sense that our country was on a meandering, yet certain path to something akin to civil war.

But then two things happened. The first, Hurricane Harvey. I never thought I would compliment the state of Texas, yet here it is: Texas, you have renewed my belief that there exists a relenting goodness in most of us. The second, Dan Morain’s apology to Harmeet Dhillon. Just when apologies seemed to be a dusty remnant of some bygone era, here comes The Bee’s editorial page editor with a sincere apology for his choice of words. I plan to share his words with my fifth-graders as an example of compassion, reflection and emotional intelligence. Thank you, for restoring some of my lost hope.

Angela F. Luna,

Sacramento

Levees, no tunnels

Re “As Hurricane Harvey hits Gulf Coast, Central Valley must prepare for the coming storm“ (sacbee.com, Aug. 30): It’s true that to protect Sacramento and the Delta, the levees must continue to be improved and maintained. However, the editorial board used one bogus statement that’s often used by proponents of the tunnels. The truth is, if there are levee failures during a superstorm, that would not affect water deliveries to farmers and urban users in Southern California, or lead to saltwater getting into the water being pumped south. That could only happen if everything fails at times of low water flow. During a superstorm, the issue would be too much fresh water flowing through the rivers. Let’s clearly separate the needs. Ongoing levee maintenance is needed. The tunnels are not.

Jan McCleery,

Discovery Bay

Eyewitness account

Re “Trump may deport her to a country she doesn’t know. You OK with that?” (sacbee.com, Sept 3): Marcos Breton misrepresented Congressman Tom McClintock’s response to a young lady who was brought to the United States as a child. Breton say that McClintock “essentially told her she had to return to El Salvador, a country she doesn’t know or remember.” The qualifier “essentially” leaves out a lot.

I was there. McClintock said that he sympathized with her plight, but he was concerned that until the borders were secure, consideration of legislation to legalize her status would encourage more illegal border crossings. Until then, he said, he could only tell her what the law requires, and that’s to return to El Salvador and apply for legal entry. Any congressman who advised someone to disobey the law has violated his oath of office. Breton should know this, but above all should be honest in presenting a complete account of the facts.

Ken Campbell, Lincoln

On track for rail

Re “California’s high-speed rail promoters should heed the wisdom of rats” (sacbee.com, Aug. 29): One must wonder how much money the Texas oil lobbyists paid Shawn Steel. Being a lifelong conservative Republican and a capitalist, the author doesn’t want the bullet train. Did he ever do any research on how much pollution is put into our environment, with all these trucks on our highways? Having a satellite dish and speaking more than one language, I get to see what really goes on around the world. Climate change is destroying our planet.

Ingrid Croissant-Huber, Roseville

The real threat

Re “Letters to the Editor: Voter registration” (sacbee.com, Sept. 3): I can tell you that, as a high school teacher, you’d be surprised how quickly these “uninformed young people” can become informed. Just give them facts and the critical-thinking skills they need to ascertain the truth about politics and the world at large.

Misinformed adults are the far greater threat. People who have made the willful choice to throw away these learned behaviors and instead rely on propaganda and preconceived notions of what they feel should be true, while labeling anything they don’t agree with as “fake news.” The real danger for our society lies here, not in young people becoming more active in the political system and their own future.

Jim Sanchez, Orangevale

A point not made

Re “Trump may deport her to a country she doesn’t know. You OK with that?” (sacbee.com, Sept 3): Marcos Breton and The Bee have hit an all-time low. You portray a photograph of a Hispanic woman who is truly a very bright and ambitious young adult and probably should be allowed to become an American citizen, and then you somehow encompass her situation by trivializing the cold-blooded murders of Detective Michael Davis and Deputy Danny Oliver.

You have the gall to say that for every illegal immigrant who murders a police officer, there are many other good ones. No doubt that’s a true, but you’ve revealed your true self: a self-serving writer who seems to be of the belief that the ends justify the means. How would you feel if the murder of someone you truly loved was used to highlight some writer’s opinion?

Robert Cosley,

El Dorado Hills

Public vs. private

Re “California’s economy depends on the future, but labor here is stuck in the past” (sacbee.com, Sept. 1): No doubt there are areas where the public sector unions could improve, but using misleading data does the author no favors. Claiming that state and local workers make 30 percent to 40 percent more than private sector employees is the classic apples-and-oranges approach and ignores real differences in occupational requirements. Furthermore, it pits middle-class against middle-class. Shouldn’t we be advocating for higher wages for all? Some are reaping enormous wealth from our economy, and it’s not the middle class.

Bryan Baldwin,

Sacramento

On monuments

I’m embarrassed for those few “offended” people who feel it necessary to remove history, accomplishing nothing. There should be a political party called “The Offended Party.” I’m trying to convince my grandchildren that there was a Civil War and there were good people on both sides.

Dave Williams, Roseville

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