Letters to the Editor

Paris summit, nuclear power, gas station

President Barack Obama, speaking Monday at a United Nations conference on climate change outside Paris, has called for global leaders to agree to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.
President Barack Obama, speaking Monday at a United Nations conference on climate change outside Paris, has called for global leaders to agree to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The Associated Press

Climate change affects all of us

Re “Obama rallies support to roll back emissions” (Page 1A, Dec. 1): If there is any issue that should cut across political lines, climate change and the summit in Paris is it.

Republican or Democrat won’t matter if we don’t, as a world body, address this critical issue and support our world leaders in crafting an agreement to reduce carbon emissions, the leading cause of global warming. If people care about their children and grandchildren or future generations, then the time is now to support actions that will give them a future.

These Paris talks are our best hope. Certain European countries are way ahead of us on taking steps toward sustainability, and rather than being an economic drain, these industries boost their economies.

Diana Halpenny,

Sacramento

Anything possible with Paris summit

Re “Californians will play unique role at Paris climate change summit” (Viewpoints, Nov. 30): Opinions differ on the potential impact of the climate summit underway in Paris. Some say any agreement is too little, too late; some say it is an important first step; and yet others say this is the most important U.N. meeting ever to address the problem of climate change.

The Sacramento Bee’s five articles published Monday certainly suggest the importance of the next two weeks as a tipping point in addressing this issue.

Whether you are a climate change optimist, pessimist or denier, you must admit that Tom Hayden giving the CIA credit is unprecedented. Perhaps the people and nations of the world will follow his example by seeing in an entirely new and unexpected way. The Paris summit will mean something only if we all commit to change and follow up with action.

Rich Howard, Carmichael

Energy options and climate change

Re “California reactors face uncertain future” (Capitol & California, Nov. 29): I support Pacific Gas and Electric if it tries to renew the license for the Diablo Canyon nuclear power plant.

Solar panel fields and wind turbine fields are expensive to maintain and take up vast amounts of land. Environmentalists seem to want to push these alternate forms of power, but they don’t want the massive power lines that are needed for the wind and solar panel farms. They seem to think that you can put a few solar panels on your roof or a few windmills somewhere, and we will have all the power we need.

Nuclear power still needs to be a part of the mix to combat climate change and for our future energy needs, and nuclear plants do not emit greenhouse gases. Rancho Seco should have never been closed. Keep an open mind.

Michael Stinson,

Sacramento

Thumbs up on gas station editorial

Re “Thumbs down on 16-pump station” (Editorial, Nov. 17): I agree with what was said in The Sacramento Bee’s editorial about the proposed 16-pump gas station for Curtis Park Village. I have been a student at Sacramento City College for two years, and this topic has been discussed in a couple of my communication classes.

Most of us have come to the agreement that a 16-pump gas station would do more than just cause traffic and noise to the Curtis Park area. It would affect nearby businesses and the students who attend City College.

The fumes from a 16-pump gas station would cause the air to become dangerous to everyone around. Global warming is already a big issue in the world, and adding a large gas station in an area that is highly populated would affect everyone negatively.

David Cofield, Sacramento

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