The Conversation

The Conversation

Protesters against legislation requiring California schoolchildren to get vaccinated hold a rally at the Capitol earlier this month. Senate Bill 277 would require most California parents to vaccinate their children as a condition of enrolling them in private or public schools.
Protesters against legislation requiring California schoolchildren to get vaccinated hold a rally at the Capitol earlier this month. Senate Bill 277 would require most California parents to vaccinate their children as a condition of enrolling them in private or public schools. The Associated Press

Last Sunday’s Conversation on vaccines and the growing distrust of health care workers and doctors worldwide generated more comments on Facebook than we have seen in quite some time. It’s a global phenomenon from developing nations to the United States, Markos Kounalakis wrote, citing the measles outbreak in Disneyland and ranging to attacks on medical workers in Somalia, Afghanistan and the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

We asked the question: Why do you think some people are now opposed to having their children vaccinated?


From Facebook

Phillip Larrea – After decades of breach-of-trust by the for-profit medical community, especially with regard to anything pharmaceutical, many are unwilling to put anything in their body that has been produced by these corporations.

Latecia Breeden – Internet hype and wanting to feel enlightened possibly. It certainly isn’t logic. The logical conclusion is to use scientific advances to protect from the big diseases. We spent decades eradicating them. Do you really want your child’s body used as a comeback machine?

Liz Taylor – This whole issue is indicative of the broken medical system. Trust is something that is earned and the medical insurance industry, along with Big Pharma, has eroded trust across the board. My kids got vaccinated, but not without a full and frank dialogue with our family doctor of many years. I would be very leery of drugstore vaccinations or something similar. Rebuild the trust and this problem will become a moot point.

Alixandra Mullins – It’s not hard to figure out. Look at the side-effects listed in the package insert that come with the vaccines. Then ask why the U.S. government has assumed liability and created a national vaccine injury registry which has paid out millions to children injured from the side effects of vaccines. I’m always surprised to find out that many people don’t even glance at the inserts when doing their shots.

Dyan Williams – Whether you’re pro-vaccine, anti-vaccine, or fall somewhere in the middle, the question you need to ask yourselves is: Do you want to live in a world where you cannot freely refuse a medical procedure that carries risk of injury or death?

Karen Campbell – Scientific illiteracy. If you don’t understand how it works, you will believe any activist who tells you something that scares you. Understand that activists don’t care if it’s true or not – all they care about is keeping up a flow of donations into their pocket so they don’t have to get a real job.

Rose Dilley – Doctors used to be family friends and neighbors and they were trusted. Now they are aloof, incorporated and promoters of the latest Big Pharma drug developed, which has led to distrust of the medical community overall, and this has fed much of the anti-vax fears. More and more people are flocking to natural remedies that sometimes work, and sometimes don’t.

Philip Sokoloski – The most basic form of consumer protection – the kind we insist on when discussing other potentially dangerous products like automobiles and over-the-counter drugs – is manufacturer liability. Federal law shields vaccine producers from liability arising from the use of vaccine products. This cannot help but erode consumer confidence in the product.

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