Capitol Alert AM Newsletter

California’s immigrant economy + Capitol Cup +Newsom’s health care tour

Bishop David Rice, second right, walks with other members of the Episcopal Church, Wil Colon, right, Ryan Newman, second left, and Nelson Serrano, left, as they walk as part of the ÒThe Pilgrimage of HopeÓ in Turlock, Calif., Saturday, May 11, 2019. The “pilgrimage” to Sacramento that started in Fresno a week ago made its way into Modesto and Turlock, with a message of solidarity with immigrants living in the Central Valley under the constant fear of deportation.
Bishop David Rice, second right, walks with other members of the Episcopal Church, Wil Colon, right, Ryan Newman, second left, and Nelson Serrano, left, as they walk as part of the ÒThe Pilgrimage of HopeÓ in Turlock, Calif., Saturday, May 11, 2019. The “pilgrimage” to Sacramento that started in Fresno a week ago made its way into Modesto and Turlock, with a message of solidarity with immigrants living in the Central Valley under the constant fear of deportation. aalfaro@modbee.com

Halfway there, California. Happy Wednesday!

IMMIGRANTS AND EDUCATION

California’s economy depends on highly educated workers, and according to an analysis out of the Public Policy Institute of California, many of the nearly 11 million immigrants living in the state came here with advanced degrees.

More than half of the newly arrived immigrants of working age in California are college graduates, up markedly from 22 percent in 1990. Thirty-seven percent of U.S.-born Californians have a degree.

The growing numbers are thanks in large part to a highly educated Asian immigration population, the majority of newcomers to the state. PPIC in the report says that California depends on immigrants to keep the economy humming. Their labor extends across every major industry, including the tech and health sectors, electronic and product manufacturing, and software publishing and computer systems design. Immigrants also help California’s nursing, agricultural and hospitality industries.

Keeping immigrants safe — In an era of increased national anti-immigrant rhetoric, the PPIC reported that most Californians are worried about how immigration enforcement will affect the future workforce, including university students covered by the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals. More than 60 percent of state residents are concerned about enforcement on K-12 students in public schools and most Californians support their local districts becoming “sanctuary” zones.

‘GEOGRAPHIC SUPREMACY’

More political games? It’s Capitol Cup time!

Northern and Southern California Lege members are kicking it together on the soccer field today in a “battle for geographic supremacy.” The annual fundraising event, in its third year, will benefit the Mercy Pedalers, a nonprofit that helps homeless people in Sacramento.

First Partner Jennifer Siebel Newsom will serve as the honorary captain. Team captains for NorCal squads: Assemblymembers Rob Bonta, D-Alamada, Jordan Cunningham, R-San Luis Obispo, and state Sen. Melissa Hurtado, D-Sanger.

Repping SoCal: state Sens. Susan Rubio, D-Baldwin Park, Ling Ling Chang, R-Diamond Bar, Ben Allen, D-Santa Monica, and Assemblywoman Blanca Rubio, D-Baldwin Park.

“As a lifelong fan of the game of soccer, and as a former soccer player myself, I have seen time and again how the game can bring together people from all walks of life,” Siebel Newsom said. “I am honored to take part in the Capitol Cup in support of such a worthy cause.”

The match is scheduled for 5 p.m. at Papa Murphy’s Park.

‘CALIFORNIA FOR ALL’

Cue Willie Nelson, Gov. Gavin Newsom is hitting the road again.

California’s new governor is touring the state this week — with stops that started in Sacramento on Tuesday and will continue through San Francisco, San Diego and Los Angeles — to tout health care proposals that include lowering prescription drug prices and moving toward a goal of covering all Californians.

Newsom’s focus on healthcare initiatives are a bulk of his “California for All” agenda. They include:

  • Expanding Medi-Cal to undocumented young adults, 19-25
  • Offering discounts to middle-income families buying insurance in the private market
  • Creating a single-purchaser system for prescription drugs
  • Moving toward a federal single-payer waiver
  • Investing $100 million in reproductive and sexual health care

With President Donald Trump fighting to dismantle the Affordable Care Act, Newsom said California has too much at stake and now “must lead” the nation in health care expansion and affordability progress.

Catch up — As The Bee’s Sophia Bollag reports, the tour comes before a critical budget deal deadline, when the Democratic governor could face potential pushback from the Legislature in getting his health care ideas in the state’s financial plan. Newsom began his tour in the capital city, where he hosted a roundtable with stakeholders who’d benefit from additional subsidies.

Bollag notes that lawmakers might struggle getting on board with the reinstatement of the individual mandate. After Trump rolled back the Obamacare provision, Newsom said penalizing residents would be an effective tool to ensure everyone has coverage. But that pushes lawmakers to vote on yet another tax in California.

“Without a mandate, you will see an increase in your premiums,” Newsom said during his May revise presser last week, continuing in a released press statement on Tuesday that “California is fighting for more health care for all Californians.”

For your radar — The UC Center Sacramento is hosting a climate change panel this afternoon. William Collins, director of the Climate and Ecological Sciences Division at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, will join Kate Gordon, director of the governor’s Office of Planning and Research, to talk about California’s climate adaptation strategy and policy that can support the state’s goals.

To register, go here. The event is scheduled for noon and will take place at 1130 K Street, room LL3.

HAPPY BIRTHDAY!

May 15 — Assemblywoman Christy Smith, D-Santa Clarita

TWEET OF THE DAY

There’s a new mural in town. Located at the Historic Elks Tower at 11th and J, the art features Chinese immigrant railroad workers as a way to celebrate the 150th anniversary of the transcontinental railroad. Mayor Darrell Steinberg said the mural offers a reminder that the city “must do better” — the Chinese workers were paid up to 50 percent less than their white counterparts — during its new renaissance.

Best of The Bee:

Hannah Wiley joined The Bee as a legislative reporter in 2019. She produces the morning newsletter for Capitol Alert and previously reported on immigration, education and criminal justice. She’s a Chicago-area native and a graduate of Saint Louis University and Northwestern.
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