Capitol Alert AM Newsletter

Use of force training costs + California families face losing benefits + Padilla’s Census organizing efforts

Los Banos police Commander Jason Hedden takes a photo of the wound suffered when a man jumped the barbed wire fence Fri., June 14, 2019 at the Merced County Courthouse on G St. Friday afternoon. Officers found Jaime Zavala, 27 of Los Banos hiding in a house on G street across the street from the courthouse. Zavala was arrested Thurs., June 13 at the same G street residence on a parole violation and was taken into custody and booked into the Los Banos jail downtown. Friday he was transported by a Merced County Sheriff van to the courthouse on G street. He fled on foot and jumped the barbed wire fence and suffered a cut to his chest.
Los Banos police Commander Jason Hedden takes a photo of the wound suffered when a man jumped the barbed wire fence Fri., June 14, 2019 at the Merced County Courthouse on G St. Friday afternoon. Officers found Jaime Zavala, 27 of Los Banos hiding in a house on G street across the street from the courthouse. Zavala was arrested Thurs., June 13 at the same G street residence on a parole violation and was taken into custody and booked into the Los Banos jail downtown. Friday he was transported by a Merced County Sheriff van to the courthouse on G street. He fled on foot and jumped the barbed wire fence and suffered a cut to his chest. glieb@losbanosenterprise.com

Happy belated Father’s Day to all you celebrating out there. My dad is my favorite human, even though his eyes glaze over when I start talking politics.

You know the drill. The Assembly begins session at 1 p.m., the Senate an hour later.

TENS OF MILLIONS

The Senate Public Safety Committee is scheduled to hear Assembly Bill 392 tomorrow morning, the police use of force bill that garnered a lot of public and media attention since the beginning of session.

Before accepting amendments, the proposal was written to elevate the current “reasonable” standard for deadly force to a much stricter “necessary.” After both lengthy and contentious discussions with law enforcement groups, Assemblywoman Shirley Weber, D-San Diego, loosened the language.

The bill now allows lethal force only when “an officer reasonably believes, based on the totality of the circumstances, that deadly force is necessary to defend against an imminent threat of death or serious bodily injury to the officer or to another person” and when apprehending a fleeing felon that threatens considerable harm.

Weber’s proposal is poised to hit Gov. Gavin Newsom’s desk after he and legislative leaders came out in support of the efforts to update the standard in May.

But a critical component of AB 392 is Senate Bill 230, the once-competing measure backed by police lobbyists that now supports the the Assembly effort by requiring law enforcement agencies to adhere to the minimum use of force standard.

The legislation, authored by state Sen. Anna Caballero, D-Salinas, also requires the Commission on Peace Officer Standards and Training to train officers on use of force and deescalation techniques.

The training department did not provide a cost estimate, but the bill analysis cites a price tag “likely in the tens of millions of dollars” to train 90,000 peace officers in the state.

The numbers:

  • To train more than 7,000 California Highway Patrol sergeants and officers, $4.1 million is needed from the Motor Vehicle Account in the State Transportation Fund.

  • The Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation estimates training will cost around $6 million in General Fund dollars.

  • Local governments will have to pick up the tab for “potentially major one-time retraining costs” for thousands of officers in 500 agencies. That sum could reach tens of millions of dollars in aggregate.

  • POST will likely see a one-time cost of $450,000 to develop the guidelines, which covers two new contract positions to oversee the development and consultation costs with experts.

DEFLATE THE POVERTY RATE

Back in May, President Donald Trump’s administration announced a proposal to alter the definition of poverty by changing how inflation is calculated.

The California Budget and Policy Center determined on Friday that the proposed change would affect low-income Californians who currently qualify for public assistance programs like Medi-Cal, CalFresh and the Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program.

In her analysis, Sara Kimberlin found that the proposed inflation change would “make the poverty thresholds increase more slowly over time” and would result in less accurate poverty thresholds. The alteration would exacerbate the disparity between the current federal poverty level of $19,749 and California’s basic family budget of nearly $66,000.

To qualify for public assistance, a family or individual’s income must be below the federal number, and a potential shift could challenge the ability to receive public benefits, Kimberlin notes. The proposal is open for public comment until this Friday, June 21.

“The poverty line is more than a measure, and ensuring that low-income Californians have access to vital public supports such as health care and food assistance,” Kimberlin wrote. “And that those benefits are not diminished over time under the guise of a technical change, should be a priority for all Californians.”

ONE, TWO, THREE CALIFORNIANS, FOUR

California Secretary of State Alex Padilla is meeting with local officials, community and regional leaders and advocates to outline the state’s 2020 Census strategy. Padilla will join Sacramento Mayor Darrell Steinberg, Yolo County Supervisor Don Saylor and Census 2020 Director Ditas Katague.

The California Complete Count – Census 2020 Office is organizing the public meeting, scheduled to begin at 10 a.m. at Sacramento State University. Today’s convening is the fourth in a series of regional visits that brings together stakeholders interested in learning how California plans to count each of its citizens in next year’s tally.

HAPPY BIRTHDAY!

June 15 — Assemblyman Kevin Mullin, D-South San Francisco

June 17 — Assemblyman Mark Stone, D-Scotts Valley

VIDEO OF THE DAY



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Hannah Wiley joined The Bee as a legislative reporter in 2019. She produces the morning newsletter for Capitol Alert and previously reported on immigration, education and criminal justice. She’s a Chicago-area native and a graduate of Saint Louis University and Northwestern.
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