Baseball

Mets GM believes Tebow will make majors. Why he could visit Sacramento along the way

Tim Tebow, seen with the Class A Columbia Fireflies in April 2017, has the confidence of the New York Mets’ organization to one day play in the major leagues.
Tim Tebow, seen with the Class A Columbia Fireflies in April 2017, has the confidence of the New York Mets’ organization to one day play in the major leagues. AP file

Tim Tebow’s NFL career was short both in time and success, but he could have a future in another sport.

One baseball general manager believes Tebow, now a minor leaguer, can make it to the show.

“Somebody asked me if thought he’d be a major league player at some point,” New York Mets GM Sandy Alderson told The Associated Press on Sunday. “I think he will play in the major leagues. That’s my guess.

“This experiment is not going to last forever, but he’s made meaningful progress,” Alderson said of Tebow, who is at the team’s spring training camp in Port St. Lucie, Fla. “We thought he would best benefit from being in major league camp – that that would accelerate his development.”

Tebow, 30, told ESPN he’s been working on his body and swing, and that he’s focused on improvement, not predictions.

“My goal isn’t about what’s going to happen one day,” Tebow said. “My goal is to focus on this day ... and working as hard as I can. I got into this because I love it. I’m passionate about it.”

Tebow played a total of 126 games last year for St. Lucie and Columbia, two of the Mets’ Class A teams, hitting .226 (97 for 430) with eight home runs, 52 RBIs and 50 runs scored. Should he work his way up to the majors this season, he’d likely spend some time with the Mets’ Triple-A affiliate, the Las Vegas 51s, who are a Pacific Coast League rival of the River Cats.

The River Cats host the 51s eight times this season, with four-game sets scheduled for May 21-24 and Aug. 24-27, meaning Tebow could have multiple chances to visit Sacramento.

Tebow has yet to reach Double A, let alone Triple A, but his stats can be found through a search on the River Cats’ website.

While his baseball career has made headlines, his athletic stardom came in another sport.

Tebow was a football star at Florida. The quarterback won the Heisman Trophy as a sophomore in the 2007-08 season and played on two national championship teams. But he played in just 37 NFL games, including two in the playoffs, over three seasons and hasn’t taken a snap since 2012.

Besides baseball, he works for ESPN and the SEC Network on college football coverage.

Despite Tebow’s broadcast obligations, the Mets organization believes in him.

“Tim Tebow’s here because he can potentially help us at the major league level,” Mets manager Mickey Callaway told The Associated Press. “He wouldn’t be here otherwise.”

  Comments