Outdoors

Never-ending ski season? Squaw Valley CEO says, ‘We’re taking a hard look at that’

Watch skier drop down Palisades run at Squaw Valley

Squaw Valley CEO Andy Wirth is giving hope to Northern California skiers and snowboarders who don’t want to see this historic season end. The resort may stay open through the summer and fall. In celebration, here's a video of an awesome run down P
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Squaw Valley CEO Andy Wirth is giving hope to Northern California skiers and snowboarders who don’t want to see this historic season end. The resort may stay open through the summer and fall. In celebration, here's a video of an awesome run down P

Squaw Valley CEO Andy Wirth is giving hope to Northern California skiers and snowboarders who don’t want to see this historic season end.

Having already stated his plans to have the slopes open on the Fourth of July, Wirth upped the ante during an interview Saturday with Truckee Tahoe Radio KTKE (101.5 FM).

“I’m actually considering staying open through the summer and fall so it becomes the 16-17-18 season,” Wirth told KTKE. “We’re taking a hard look at that. Maybe we spin Shirley (chairlift) through the summer. There’s so much snow up there.”

As of Monday, the Sierra snowpack is 85 percent above average. With 705 inches (58 feet, 9 inches) of total snowfall, including 20 inches over the last seven days, Squaw Valley is one of several Lake Tahoe ski resorts to cross the 700-inch thresh hold this season, joining Sugar Bowl (782), Mt. Rose (761), Boreal (742) and Northstar (708).

This season has brought the second-most snowfall ever recorded at Squaw Valley, ranking behind the 2010-11 season that saw 810 inches, according to a news release from the resort.

“It’s been an incredible winter,” Wirth said. “Unprecedented.”

So, what would hitting the slopes throughout the summer and fall potentially look like? It might take a little hiking.

“We think it would be a cool thing if people uploaded on the tram, maybe likely hike across the ridge there a couple hundred meters, and dropped Shirley,” Wirth said.

That might be easier than buying a plane ticket to the Southern Hemisphere to get some turns in.

On Thursday, March 30, 2017 the state recorded 94 inches of snow at the Phillips Station off Highway 50 in the Sierra. Melted down, that would be the equivalent of 46 inches of water. The readings represent 183 percent of the long-term average at

Entering April 2017, the Sierra snowpack is 164 percent of normal. That’s a big difference from a few years ago – the snowpack was 6 percent of normal in on March 29, 2015. This series of satellite images shows the snow accumulation from space at

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