Leading Off

How does Warriors’ title rank with other Bay Area champions?

Golden State Warriors guard Stephen Curry, top, carries the Larry O'Brien championship trophy behind forward David Lee after the team landed in Oakland, Calif., Wednesday, June 17, 2015. The Warriors beat the Cleveland Cavaliers to win their first NBA championship since 1975.
Golden State Warriors guard Stephen Curry, top, carries the Larry O'Brien championship trophy behind forward David Lee after the team landed in Oakland, Calif., Wednesday, June 17, 2015. The Warriors beat the Cleveland Cavaliers to win their first NBA championship since 1975. AP

This, that and the other thing:

▪ The Golden State Warriors didn’t win their first NBA title Tuesday night, but considering it was 40 years since their last title, it sure felt like it. For most Warriors fans, there’s no better moment in franchise history.

So how does Golden State’s incredible ride to the NBA championship rank among titles won by other Bay Area pro sports franchises?

Does it rate better than the 49ers’ first Super Bowl victory in the 1981 season? Of course not. Nobody expected Joe Montana, in his first full season as starting quarterback, to lead a team that went 6-10 the prior year to what became the team of the 1980s.

Does it rank with the Giants winning their first World Series in San Francisco in 2010? Close, but no. San Francisco had to beat San Diego in a do-or-die season finale for the National League West title before its magical ride through the postseason.

The Warriors’ title run ranks somewhere between the Raiders winning their first Super Bowl in the 1976 season and the A’s winning the first of three consecutive World Series titles in 1972.

▪ When the Cavaliers crept within four points of the Warriors with 33.2 seconds to play Tuesday, I began to wonder if we were about to see the biggest choke job in Golden State history since Latrell Sprewell wrapped his fingers around the neck of then-Warriors coach P.J. Carlesimo in a fit of rage in 1997.

Talk about some dark days in Warriors lore.

▪ There was speculation the Warriors might hold their victory celebration in “The City” rather than in Oakland. Whether or not that scenario was considered, keeping the party in Oakland was the safe – and right – move by the Warriors.

The procession will begin Friday at 10 a.m. at 11th Street and Broadway, continue onto Grand Avenue, Harrison Street, Lakeside Drive (Lake Merritt) and to a public rally at the Henry J. Kaiser Convention Center. Stay classy, Oakland.

Victor Contreras: (916) 326-5527, vcontreras@sacbee.com, @SacBeeVictor

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