Arts & Theater

UC Davis exhibit aims to bring Japanese marketplace experience to life

Garments from the collection of Catherine Cerny on display at ‘Tekunikku: The Art of Japanese Textile Making’ at UC Davis’s Design Museum.
Garments from the collection of Catherine Cerny on display at ‘Tekunikku: The Art of Japanese Textile Making’ at UC Davis’s Design Museum. Justin Han - UC Regents

“Tekunikku: The Art of Japanese Textile Making” is the newest art exhibit on display at UC Davis’s Design Museum.

The exhibit features a collection of textiles from the collection of UC Davis alumna Catherine Cerny. Cerny graduated from UC Davis Department of Design in 1970 and worked as a costume designer until she decided to go into academia as a professor at the university.

Cerny lived in Japan with her father when she was a child. UC Davis spokesman Michael French said that she has she has been collecting textiles on her visits back to Japan for over 40 years.

Fellow UC Davis Department of Design alumna Alicia Decker reached out to Cerny because of her “amazing collection,” French said. From there, the pair worked together to curate an immersive exhibit featuring pieces from different periods of time.

“Japanese textiles demonstrate a rich tradition of design making, and exemplify unique techniques that continue to inform contemporary textile/fashion design and education,” Decker said in a release. “‘Tekunikku’ focuses on the extensive Japanese textile collection of Cerny and pans over 40 years of firsthand cultural exploration and technical study.”

The exhibit “echoes the feel of a Japanese marketplace,” French said, to make visitors feel like they are getting a fully immersive marketplace experience.

French said that the exhibit shows how the art of textile making in Japan has influenced style all over the world.

“One of the important things about the exhibit is that you’ll really notice how Japanese textiles are still forming to help create current textiles,” French said. “You can see how they are influencing style today. You’ll see a contemporary feel, even though they’re 40 years old. There’s a timelessness to them.”

The exhibit opened Oct. 1 and will be on display until Dec. 9 at UC Davis’s Design Museum in Cruess Hall, Room 124. The exhibit is free and open on weekdays from 12 p.m. to 4 p.m., and on Sundays from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m.

  Comments