Arts & Theater

Art courses aim to help novice adults unlock their inner creativity

Girls work on a Girl Scout painting badge led by artist Deidre Trudeau. The project included all of the requirements for both brownies and juniors to obtain their badges at the Girl Scouts headquarters in Sacramento.
Girls work on a Girl Scout painting badge led by artist Deidre Trudeau. The project included all of the requirements for both brownies and juniors to obtain their badges at the Girl Scouts headquarters in Sacramento.

Many people will say — and truly believe — they are incapable of producing a work of art. Who among us doesn’t know at least one person who claims to be woefully without artistic ability, unable to draw or paint, lacking the inspiration to put pen to paper?

This presents a conundrum: How can those who feel artistically blocked or inadequate tap into, reconnect with and express their innate talents and creativity to enjoy richer, more satisfying and empowered lives?

This January, at Blue Line Arts gallery in Roseville, accomplished artist Deidre Trudeau will lead two six-week courses to address that question. Trudeau believes that the key to unlocking creativity lies in self-examination, in peeling back the protective layers many have erected around their creative chambers.

“That’s what I call these places: they are playshops,” said Trudeau. “It is about playing. And the reason why I use the word ‘play’ is to get [my students] back into their head when they were 8 years old and wounded, and learned insecurities and started to bury themselves in ego. That’s where I take them all back to.”

In “Creative CORE Art Exploration,” held Wednesdays from Jan. 16 through Feb. 20, new and experienced artists alike are invited to examine and express emotion through color and shape. The course will cover the meaning of shapes, colors and directionality in art, and students will create clay sculptures and acrylic-and-watercolor paintings based on their feelings and moods. The course exercises are designed to be fun and accessible to everyone, and students will have an opportunity to combine aleatoric art-making techniques with more academic concepts, determined by their personal preferences and experiences.

For the more science-minded, Trudeau is also offering “Science of Color,” held Thursdays from Jan. 17 through Feb. 21. The course uses STEAM teaching standards to investigate color through the lens of math and science. Students will conduct experiments, explore color mixing and use various media to create unique artworks. Students will also be introduced to concepts of neuroplasticity through guided visualization and other exercises.

“Color has an actual, measurable vibration,” said Trudeau. “I show people how powerful the vibrations of what they surround themselves with are in their lives and also how powerful their self-talk is. Your brain does not know the difference between what you convince it of and what really is.”

Trudeau, an Air Force veteran, has long taught art as therapy for veterans and as a vehicle for women’s empowerment and self-actualization. She believes the skills she teaches to unlock creativity in her courses are skills that her students can use to “walk powerfully and empowered towards manifesting whatever it is they’d like to try to work towards.”

“I learned there are a remarkable number of individuals who are not able to identify or realize their ultimate dreams, often due to the inability to tap deeply into their own personal place of discovery,” said Trudeau. “There’s a dialogue back and forth between creativity, inspiration and transformation. I ask, ‘What’s your ultimate why?’ I want to get into you and where your spark ignites. It’s not all about art; art just happens to be a way that I traverse this life. It’s about if you want to learn to go deeper from wherever you are.”

For more information about Trudeau, visit instagram.com/artfuli. More information about her upcoming courses at Blue Line Arts gallery can be found at bluelinearts.org/events.

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