Travel

Provisions: Stuff for travel and recreation

The Hövding bicycle helmet “airbag.”
The Hövding bicycle helmet “airbag.” Hövding

A guide for what you need to buy, read or consume to enhance your recreation and travel experience

Buy

Hövding Airbag for Cyclists

$335; hovding.com

The Swedes have come up with a bicycle helmet that will let you ride with wind blowing through your hair but, in case of a crash, inflates like a car airbag and covers your head. You place a nylon collar around your neck – it zips up – and the USB-rechargeable battery lasts for 18 hours of cycling. When the sensors detect an impact, the airbag inflates in the shape of your cranium. The Hövding website has posted a fascinating video of a stunt cyclist. The only downside – aside from the hefty price tag – is that the Hövding is good for one crash only.

The list

Lonely Planet’s “Stuff You Should Never Take on a Trip”

lonelyplanet.com

Lonely Planet writer Leif Pettersen, who apparently likes to travel light and is a mite fussy, weighs in on what not to bring:

1. More than one suitcase

2. Guitars

3. Full-size pillows

4. Hairdryers/curling irons

5. Pets

6. More than two pair of shoes

7. Children

8. Over-sized souvenirs

The quote

Ultrarunner Dakota Jones on irunfar.com: “I’m certainly proud of my ability to run far, but it doesn’t mean running is better than backpacking. It’s not like most of those backpackers couldn’t do the kind of running I do. A lot of them, in fact, are probably out there in such style for a specific reason.”

Compiled by Sam McManis/smcmanis@sacbee.com

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