Recipes

Punch for a party? Start with the right wine – and lots of ice

Lost Leaves Punch is concocted of vermouth and Calvados, with citrus for brightness.
Lost Leaves Punch is concocted of vermouth and Calvados, with citrus for brightness. For The Washington Post

Concocting a giant batch of something that will bring pleasure and conviviality to friends and loved ones is one of the joys of the season. I’ll be making several more rounds for holiday parties, and I have lately been exploring punches made with fortified wine.

Good port, Madeira, sherry, vermouth or quinquina (an herb-bittered wine such as Barolo Chinato and Byrrh) brings an immediate depth and complexity to a punch, enough so that your role can shift from architect to enabler: Rather than use a long roster of ingredients to build a quaff of complexity, your primary job is to stay out of the way of the complexity that’s already there.

Those wines are a marvelous cheat. As Scott Baird of the San Francisco-based hospitality group the Bon Vivants points out, “Vermouth by itself is a cocktail in a bottle in a lot of ways.” The same goes for even those fortified wines that haven’t been herbally complicated: A bottle of port can bring notes of figs or raisins, sherry traces of hazelnuts or honey, vermouths and gentian wines bitter herbs or winter spices. If you use them well, your party-prep load – and your guests’ spirits – will be much lightened.

To get some historical inspiration, I foolishly called drink historian David Wondrich, author of the seminal text “Punch: The Delights (and Dangers) of the Flowing Bowl” (TarcherPerigee, $25, 320 pages). The book contains a handful of historical recipes for “punch royal”; the “royal,” Wondrich writes, is 17th-century English shorthand for a drink that had been upgraded from the common man’s ale or beer to a more aristocratic wine base.

I was foolish to call Wondrich not because talking to him is unpleasant but because whenever I talk to him, my plans to make a civilized little quaff meet the unstoppable force of his raconteuring, and I start to develop Terrible Ambitions.

“The problem with punch royal is that it was kind of hot rails to hell,” Wondrich says. “It can be nice when you add water and ice, but they didn’t always add the ice. Then you end up with one of my all-time favorite wine punches, Chatham Artillery Punch, which is absolutely lethal, but so pleasant.”

Chatham Artillery Punch – or, as Wondrich referred to it, “the sweet tears of Satan” – is a 19th-century Georgia recipe that comprises one part each rum, bourbon and cognac to three parts champagne. When the ice is omitted, the only non-alcoholic elements in the traditional version are lemon and sugar. Wondrich recalled making a batch in a bathtub for 400 people at a conference, using three cases of sparkling wine and a case each of rum, bourbon and cognac. “They drank it in less than an hour. . . . There were issues along the lines of ‘Where are my pants?’ 

Which, circling back, is why wine punches are so great: The good ones are festive and delicious enough that you can keep your bathtub free for guests who have overindulged and may need a place to nap.

Take the Bon Vivants’ Lost Leaves Punch with spiced apples and vermouth. “I’ve got a real guideline I live by, which is, ‘Don’t fight the obvious,’ ” says Baird. “All of those flavors suit this time of year. Even standing alone, each is a flavor of this season, but combined they work together very well.”

The vermouth is the lovely Noilly Prat Ambr, a sweet, golden wine that Baird says is one of his all-time favorites, so good that “the French kept most of it.”

Washington’s Dan Searing, author of “The Punch Bowl,” hits holiday notes through and through with his Conquistador Punch, primarily because of how it incorporates clementines, a fruit of the season. They have a brightness and florality different from those of standard oranges, and the smell of their skins – a small round of which should be twisted over each serving of the punch, coating the surface with a trace of its aromatic oils – is an olfactory Christmas carol.

For my own contribution, I started with Byrrh, a bittersweet French aperitif wine that I’m crazy for; made it richer with cognac and cassis; then smacked it with the baking-spice notes of Angostura bitters and vanilla. Be careful with the vanilla: It adds a rich and flavor-binding note, but in drinks it must be used with great restraint or it turns into a kraken, lurking at the bottom of the bowl and determined to strangle every other flavor with its tentacles.

As with all punches, recall Wondrich’s “hot rails to hell” caveat and remember to use plenty of ice. Dilution is key to a proper punch, not only to the flavor but to your guests’ sanity and decorum. If you forget it, Uber is likely to start surge-pricing just for your party. But get it right, and you’ll help your guests sail into the new year – rich in wine, friendship and vitamin C.

Byrrh Royale Punch

Serves 16

Cassis liqueur and the French aperitif wine Byrrh are a classic pairing; this punch-bowl-friendly recipe adds depth and seasonality, with a hint of cognac and the spice of Angostura. Not every wine store sells Byrrh – call ahead before making a trip, or search online for nearby stores that carry it. In a pinch, substitute Dubonnet Rouge. From Spirits columnist M. Carrie Allan.

Make ahead: To make a punch-bowl-size block of ice, freeze water in a deep cereal bowl or plastic container a day in advance. Toss a few berries into the water for a festive touch.

1 large block ice (see note above)

One 750-ml bottle Byrrh aperitif (see note above)

1 cup (237 ml) creme de cassis

1 cup (237 ml) cognac

1/2 cup (119 ml) honey syrup (see below)

2 teaspoons (16 dashes) Angostura bitters

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

Raspberries, blackberries, lemon wheels and/or blood orange wheels for garnish

One 750-ml bottle Brut-style champagne or prosecco

Place the block of ice in a punch bowl. Add the Byrrh, creme de cassis, cognac, honey syrup, bitters and vanilla extract, stirring to combine. Add the fruit garnishes.

When ready to serve, top the punch with the champagne or prosecco and stir gently. Ladle into punch cups.

To make the honey syrup: Combine 1/4 cup of honey and 1/4 cup of water in a small saucepan over medium heat, stirring until the honey dissolves. Let it cool completely before using. The yield is 1/2 cup.

Per serving: 160 calories, 0 g protein, 12 g carbohydrates, 0 g fat, 0 g saturated fat, 0 mg cholesterol, 0 mg sodium, 0 g dietary fiber, 10 g sugar

Lost Leaves Punch

Serves 12 to 16

This punch is a golden apple-spice drink perfect for the season. From Scott Baird, co-founder of the Bon Vivants in San Francisco.

Make ahead: To make a punch-bowl-size block of ice, freeze water in a deep cereal bowl or plastic container a day in advance. Toss a few berries into the water for a festive touch.

From Scott Baird, co-founder of the Bon Vivants in San Francisco.

1 large block ice (see note above)

One 750-ml bottle Noilly Prat Ambr vermouth, or any amber vermouth

1 generous cup (250 ml) Calvados

1 generous cup (250 ml) fresh, unsweetened apple cider

2 generous cups (500 ml) chilled oolong tea

1/2 teaspoon Angostura bitters

A generous 1/2 cup (125 ml) fresh lemon juice (from 2 lemons)

1/3 cup (75 ml) brown sugar simple syrup (see below)

Apple and lemon, for garnish

Place the block of ice in a large punch bowl.

Combine the vermouth, Calvados, cider, tea and bitters in a large pitcher, stirring to combine. Gradually add the lemon juice and the brown sugar syrup, tasting to make sure the sweetness and acidity are to your liking.

Pour the punch gently over the ice in the bowl. Just before serving, slice the fruit very thin and gently place the slices on the surface of the punch, so they float.

To make the brown sugar simple syrup: Combine 1/2 cup of dark brown sugar and 1/2 cup of water in a small saucepan over medium heat, stirring until the sugar has dissolved. Cook for 2 minutes, then let the syrup cool completely before using. (You may have a little syrup left over; it can be refrigerated for several weeks.)

Per serving (based on 16): 90 calories, 0 g protein, 5 g carbohydrates, 0 g fat, 0 g saturated fat, 0 mg cholesterol, 0 mg sodium, 0 g dietary fiber, 5 g sugar

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