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Protesters again disrupt Sacramento City Council meeting

Video: Sacramento City Council leaves meeting after protesters yell

Tuesday night’s meeting was delayed 12 minutes after a protester stood up and began reading prepared remarks criticizing the arrests of two women during a heated meeting Oct. 27 in which the council approved an increase in the minimum wage.
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Tuesday night’s meeting was delayed 12 minutes after a protester stood up and began reading prepared remarks criticizing the arrests of two women during a heated meeting Oct. 27 in which the council approved an increase in the minimum wage.

For the second straight week, protesters disrupted a Sacramento City Council meeting.

Tuesday night’s meeting was delayed 12 minutes after a protester stood up and began reading prepared remarks criticizing the arrests of two women during a heated meeting Oct. 27 in which the council approved an increase in the minimum wage.

Councilwoman Angelique Ashby, who was running Tuesday’s council meeting, started the session by addressing the arrests from a week ago.

“We want to avoid that and we want to be able to do the city’s business without interruption,” she said, addressing an audience of about 120 people. “We feel it’s unfortunate that any City Council meeting ends with people being detained or arrested. We want to make sure everyone is heard.”

Ashby was running the meeting because Mayor Kevin Johnson was absent.

As Ashby finished her remarks, James Clark, a frequent critic of the City Council known by fellow protesters as “Faygo,” stood and began reading from a piece of paper.

“We the people of Sacramento are outraged by this council’s actions last week,” he read loudly.

The seven members of the City Council in attendance, along with City Clerk Shirley Concolino and City Manager John Shirey, left the dais for a private room adjacent to the council chambers. After they returned, Ashby warned protesters they would be arrested if they disrupted the meeting again.

Two women were arrested during the Oct. 27 council meeting after raising their voices in opposition to the minimum wage plan. The women were part of a large group of critics who said the eventual increase in the minimum wage to $12.50 an hour is not high enough.

Ryan Lillis: 916-321-1085, @Ryan_Lillis

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