Business & Real Estate

Do you like your job? Here’s when that’s likely to change, study says

Are robots happy on the job? One in six people over age 35 aren’t, according to a new report by a British recruitment agency.
Are robots happy on the job? One in six people over age 35 aren’t, according to a new report by a British recruitment agency. The Associated Press file

One in six British workers over age 35 say they are unhappy at work, reports a new study.

That number more than doubles the figure for people under 35, says research by Happiness Works for Robert Half UK, a recruitment agency. The survey targeted more than 2,000 British workers.

The survey found that 8 percent of workers ages 18-34 reported being unhappy at work, compared to 16 percent for workers ages 35-54 and 17 percent of those over 55.

Job stress and, perhaps not surprisingly, work-life balance complaints also rose as workers aged. Older workers also reported they were less likely to have good friends at work, while three in five workers ages 18-34 counted co-workers as good friends.

On the other hand, 68 percent of workers ages 35-54 reported feeling free to be themselves at work, compared to 38 percent of workers ages 18-34 and 34 percent of those over 55.

But older workers feel unappreciated, which 25 percent of workers ages 35-54 and 28 percent of workers over 55 saying they don’t feel valued at work. Only 15 percent of those ages 18-34 report feeling unappreciated, while 59 percent report feeling valued at work.

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