Business & Real Estate

Lake Tahoe home on market for $1.57 million takes nature, adds harmony and style

This Lake Tahoe home is on market for $1.57 million

A Lake Tahoe home renowned for existing in harmony with nature is on the market for $1,574,000. The mountain retreat was dubbed “Phoenix House” by its original owner, architect Walt Harvey, who was a professor of architecture at Sacramento State.
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A Lake Tahoe home renowned for existing in harmony with nature is on the market for $1,574,000. The mountain retreat was dubbed “Phoenix House” by its original owner, architect Walt Harvey, who was a professor of architecture at Sacramento State.

A Lake Tahoe home renowned for existing in harmony with nature is on the market for $1,574,000.

The mountain retreat was dubbed “Phoenix House” by its original owner, architect Walt Harvey, who was a professor of architecture at Sacramento State. Harvey died in 2008.

“The home was created to live with nature; surrounding a granite boulder, a cedar tree, and an authentic Indian grinding stone, the home is set over a creek which provides a transformative experience,” according to the Granger Group’s listing of the home.

“This modern, reclaimed redwood home is literally embedded into the hillside and nature spanning four floors with decks on every level,” the listing said.

Phoenix House, located in Carnelian Bay, overlooks Lake Tahoe. Just over 3,000 square feet, the house spans four floors, each lined with decks to allow for maximum views of the surrounding scenery.

Harvey would invite his students to Lake Tahoe during the summers to work on building the home, according to realtor.com. The name Phoenix House was symbolic of Harvey's rebirth after a series of personal tragedies, including the death of his daughter and the end of his marriage, according to listing agent Linda Granger.

There are many experimental features of the house, rooted in the Frank Lloyd Wright philosophy of "organic" design, according to realtor.com. Granger said nature’s influence is evident, from the huge granite boulder in the middle of the living room, to a rushing creek running under the home, which can be viewed through glass from inside.

David Caraccio: 916-321-1125, @DavidCaraccio

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