Business & Real Estate

Daffodil Hill to shut indefinitely as crowds create safety hazards, owners say

Daffodil Hill is about to open for 2019. We got a sneak peek with our drone

We take you on a visit to popular Amador County tourist destination Daffodil Hill one day before its grand opening for 2019. The McLaughlin ranch is expected to open Saturday, March 30. Late rains ruined its 2018 season.
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We take you on a visit to popular Amador County tourist destination Daffodil Hill one day before its grand opening for 2019. The McLaughlin ranch is expected to open Saturday, March 30. Late rains ruined its 2018 season.

Daffodil Hill, the beloved flowering tourist attraction in the Sierra foothills, will close indefinitely due to concerns of overcrowding.

In a Facebook post, the owners of Daffodil Hill, near Volcano in Amador County, announced their decision Monday to shut down following safety hazards and congestion as large crowds flocked to the ranch.

“It is this overwhelming popularity that has led us to our decision to close,” Daffodil Hill’s owners said in the post. “After the crush of visitors that descended upon our Hill this year, we came to realize that the limitation on the size of our parking areas and the inability of the local road infrastructure to handle the volume, created liability and safety concerns for everyone involved.”

The owners went on to say that when thousands of visitors descended on Daffodil Hill on its opening weekend earlier this year, local roadways were jammed, leading to parking lines two hours long and dangerous last-ditch parking maneuvers.

Some visitors parked illegally on narrow roadways and walked through traffic, they said, potentially blocking emergency responder access.

“Despite our best efforts, the volume of visitors was just too much for the roadways, the Hill itself, and there is simply not enough space for everyone to park,” the post said.

Although Daffodil Hill’s owners explored ways to manage the influx of visitors, including shuttle services and reservations, they determined that the surrounding infrastructure simply cannot handle the kind of volume that its golden meadows draw, according to the post.

Daffodil Hill was purchased by the McLaughlin family in 1887. During a good season, more than 300,000 flowers can bloom on the property.

“Our entire family, all six generations, sends each and every one of you a heartfelt ‘Thank You’ for all the kind words of support, your patronage, and appreciation of the Hill over these many years,” the post said. “As we close this wonderful chapter in our family history, we ask that you honor our ancestors by continuing to appreciate Mother Nature in all her glory whenever and wherever you can.”

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