California

It looked like an ice cream truck. Actually on the menu: meth and weed, Calif. cops say

When authorities raided the truck, they found a bag of methamphetamine, marijuana in mason jars and small baggies, a box of sandwich bags, a scale and a revolver, photos show.
When authorities raided the truck, they found a bag of methamphetamine, marijuana in mason jars and small baggies, a box of sandwich bags, a scale and a revolver, photos show. Long Beach Police Department

This Southern California ice cream truck took false advertising to a whole new level.

On its side, the white truck in North Long Beach featured signs offering frozen treats like ice cream cones, Popsicles and ice cream sandwiches. Some of the goodies were even shaped like cartoon characters — from SpongeBob SquarePants and Spider-Man to Minions, photos show.

But that’s not what the two men operating the truck were really selling, Long Beach police said in a Sunday post on Twitter.

When authorities raided the truck, they found a bag of methamphetamine, marijuana in mason jars and small baggies, a box of sandwich bags, a scale, a wad of cash and a revolver, photos show.

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Police estimated the drugs were worth between $2,000 and $4,000. Long Beach Police Department

Two suspects from Long Beach — 57-year-old George Sylvester Williams and 41-year-old Monti Michael Ware — were arrested on suspicion of selling drugs from the vehicle, the Long Beach Press-Telegram reports. The arrest happened around 4 p.m. on Sunday.

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Police said Williams is being held on $30,000 bail, while Ware — who also faces charges for possessing a gun while dealing drugs and possessing a gun as an ex-felon — is being held on $50,000 bail, the Press-Telegram reports.

Long Beach police spokeswoman Arantxa Chavarria said the drugs the men kept in the ice cream truck would have sold on the street for as much as $4,000, the Long Beach Post reports.

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