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Migrants from countries disparaged by Trump are among California’s best-educated residents

Reporters try to quiz Trump over 'shithole' remark at MLK event

A day after President Donald Trump apparently described African countries as "shithole countries" in White House meetings, the president repeated the words of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr: "that no matter what the color of our skin, or the place of
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A day after President Donald Trump apparently described African countries as "shithole countries" in White House meetings, the president repeated the words of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr: "that no matter what the color of our skin, or the place of

African migrants to California are far more likely to have a four-year college degree than Californians born in the United States, census figures show.

Last week, President Donald Trump reportedly asked why the United States should accept migrants from “shithole countries” including African nations and Haiti. He reportedly made the comments during a discussion with legislators about a bipartisan immigration bill. The exact words used by the president are a matter of some dispute. Trump said reports about his statements at the meeting are wrong.

California is home to 184,000 African migrants, according to census data covering 2011 through 2015. More than 10,000 of those migrants live in the Sacramento region.

About 51 percent of African migrants between 25 and 64 living in California hold a bachelor’s degree, compared to 35 percent of all Californians in that age range born in the United States.

Nearly 20 percent of African migrants between 25 and 64 living in California hold a graduate degree, compared to 12 percent of all Californians born in the United States, the census figures show.

African migrants in California most often work as registered nurses and nursing aides.

The leading countries of birth for African migrants to California are Egypt, Nigeria, Ethiopia, South Africa and Kenya.

California is also home to about 4,000 migrants from Haiti. Census data on that small of a population may be unreliable due to sampling error.

Phillip Reese is The Bee’s data specialist and teaches at Sacramento State. Reach him at 916-321-1137 or 916-278-5420.

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