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Arcade Creek hits flood monitoring stage

Becca and Randy Smith prepare sandbags to protect their neighbor's home from the overflowing Arcade Creek at the corner of Pasadena Ave and Winding Way Thursday.
Becca and Randy Smith prepare sandbags to protect their neighbor's home from the overflowing Arcade Creek at the corner of Pasadena Ave and Winding Way Thursday. Aseng@sacbee.com

Arcade Creek near American River College reached a flood monitoring stage at 6 p.m. Thursday, the first stream in Sacramento to hit that level.

The creek, which works its way through neighborhoods in northern Sacramento County and into the city of Sacramento, had risen nearly 10 feet in the past 24 hours, according to Sacramento County’s stream alert system.

The highest levels were being reported at Winding Way, where the road crosses the creek near American River College.

Just a few blocks away, on Pasadena Avenue, residents hustled to fill sand bags. Sacramento County officials had dumped a truckload of sand on the street for residents to use if necessary.

But resident Randy Smith said the storm was turning out to be better than expected. The creek was 2 feet below flood monitoring levels at Pasadena Avenue.

“We’re doing this as a precautionary measure,” he said. “There’s no story here.”

Nearby, Bentley Mymka, 53, stopped at the Pasadena Avenue footbridge over the creek to snap photos with his iPhone. Mymka, wearing shorts and a neon-colored shirt, was finishing up his daily 25-mile commute to downtown.

“Two weeks ago, there was no water, just a sandy bottom,” said Mymka, pointing to the water spilling over the banks. “It hasn’t been this high in a while.”

He said the storm has been “overhyped.” While he didn’t change his commute, Mymka said he saw fewer bicycles on the road.

Mymka also wasn't deterred by a big puddle on the far side of the footbridge –he rode straight through it.

Meanwhile, in Placer County, officials said they expect the Walerga Road bridge over Dry Creek to flood in the next hour. John McEldowney, program manager for the Placer County Office of Emergency Services, said the houses nearby could be at risk for flooding.

Call The Bee’s Ryan Lillis, (916) 321-1085. Read his City Beat blog at www.sacbee.com/citybeat.

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