Crime - Sacto 911

How agents snared a Sacramento-area drug ring — despite undercover source ODing after deal

Death is 'collateral damage' for fentanyl dealers

The state Assembly Appropriation Committee on Aug. 11, 2016 killed SB 1323 to increase penalties for drug traffickers of fentanyl. Orange Co. Sheriff's Captain Stu Greenberg says drug dealers consider fentanyl deaths "collateral damage."
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The state Assembly Appropriation Committee on Aug. 11, 2016 killed SB 1323 to increase penalties for drug traffickers of fentanyl. Orange Co. Sheriff's Captain Stu Greenberg says drug dealers consider fentanyl deaths "collateral damage."

The last time Saybyn Borges was out in public, he was ramming an unmarked police car and racing away from it in Stockton as he tossed items from his car, authorities say.

By the time he was caught after a short chase on June 7, the 27-year-old Sacramento man was found with more than 100 small blue tablets in his car, and officers picked up hundreds more along the roadside near where the chase occurred, court records say.

Authorities now say Borges and an alleged accomplice were involved in the distribution of thousands of counterfeit oxycodone tablets containing fentanyl, a powerful synthetic opioid that the federal government says has killed more than 20,000 people since 2000.

Borges and Alfredo Sanchez, a 39-year-old Madera man suspected of supplying Borges with the pills, were indicted Thursday by a federal grand jury in Sacramento and were arraigned Friday afternoon on charges of conspiracy, distribution and possession of fentanyl.

They were ordered to return to court Sept. 13.

Court documents say the case began in April with an investigation into drug trafficking in Placer, Sacramento and San Joaquin counties.

A confidential source made a series of calls to Borges that were secretly recorded and resulted in a deal going down in an Auburn parking lot, where the source handed Borges $10,000 in exchange for a glass jar filled with blue tablets, court documents say.

The deal did not go exactly as planned, however. After the source left with the pills and handed them over to agents, one of them later got a phone call from Auburn police reporting that their source had overdosed on something.

The source later admitted to taking “three of the oxycodone tablets during the controlled buy from Borges and (ingesting) three of them.”

The pills from the buy were tested at the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration’s western regional lab and tested positive for fentanyl, court records say.

The investigation continued, with the source calling and texting Borges and, eventually, negotiating a deal for 7,000 tablets for a price of $126,000, court records say.

Borges met up with the source and two undercover police officers on June 7 in a Stockton parking lot, where Borges pulled a handful of small blue tablets from a brown paper bag to show them, court records say.

Officers then moved to arrest Borges, but he wasn’t ready to comply, attempting to escape in his gold Nissan Altima, according to court records.

“Borges then used his vehicle to break containment by ramming his vehicle into an unmarked law enforcement vehicle,” court documents say. “When Borges rammed the law enforcement vehicle, the vehicle was pushed into a law enforcement officer, causing injury to the officer as Borges fled the scene.

“Officers pursued Borges and observed him throwing items out of the vehicle.”

Borges, who is listed in court documents as a registered sex offender in Nevada, is being held in the Sacramento County Jail. He is believed to have received the drugs from Sanchez, who is out of custody on an unsecured $100,000 bond, court records say.

A criminal complaint against Sanchez says agents saw Borges meet with a man believed to be Sanchez in a Chowchilla Jack-in-the-Box parking lot the day before Borges was arrested in the aborted deal in Stockton.

Sanchez, who court records say had a previous 2009 drug arrest in San Francisco, was found to have three pistols and a shotgun at his home and faces a charge of being a felon in possession of a firearm.

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