Crime - Sacto 911

Former IRS criminal investigator sentenced to over four years in prison for tax fraud

Claire Busby said she was paralyzed when a bed she was having sex in suddenly collapsed. She sued, claiming the bed was not faulty.  A judge decided it was an unforeseeable accident and ordered no damages.
Claire Busby said she was paralyzed when a bed she was having sex in suddenly collapsed. She sued, claiming the bed was not faulty. A judge decided it was an unforeseeable accident and ordered no damages. File

A Sacramento woman who worked as an IRS investigator was sentenced Tuesday to 51 months in prison for tax fraud, stealing government money and obstructing justice after filing false tax returns for three years and interfering in her investigation.

Alena Aleykina, a former special agent with the Internal Revenue Service’s Criminal Investigation Division, filed six false tax returns from 2009 to 2011, three for personal income and three for trusts she had created, according to a news release issued by the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Northern District of California.

Aleykina, who also is a certified public accountant, fraudulently claimed head of household status, false education expense deductions and listed false dependents on her personal tax returns. On a trust tax return, she falsely claimed to be paying her mother and sister to take care of her son and father, according to the release.

In addition, she was awarded a fraudulent legal separation from her husband by the California Superior Court for Yolo County in order to claim real estate loss deductions and illegally received $4,000 from the IRS’s employee tuition assistance program by falsely claiming to be taking English classes, according to the release.

During the course of her investigation, Aleykina lied to authorities about the location of her government-issued laptop and deleted dozens of files from it without their knowledge, according to the release.

Aleykina, who was convicted in June, was also ordered to serve three years of supervised release and pay $4,000 in restitution to the IRS, according to the release.

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