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New leads sought in 35-year-old El Dorado County homicide

New leads sought in 35-year-old El Dorado County cold case

The El Dorado County District Attorney's Office hopes to elicit new information in a 35-year-old cold case involving the disappearance and death of a 28-year-old Placerville woman.
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The El Dorado County District Attorney's Office hopes to elicit new information in a 35-year-old cold case involving the disappearance and death of a 28-year-old Placerville woman.

The El Dorado County District Attorney’s Office hopes to elicit new information in a 35-year-old cold case involving the disappearance and death of a 28-year-old Placerville woman.

Debney Lynn Lobanoff was last seen by her husband in December 1981 at their Placerville home. The couple were having marital troubles at the time, and Lobanoff’s husband reported that she left the home with two “biker-type” men who were going to give her a ride to the East Coast, according to a District Attorney’s Office news release. At the time of her disappearance, Lobanoff was the mother of a young child.

On July 3, 1982, a fisherman discovered the nude body of a woman in the water at Slab Creek Reservoir near Placerville. The body was wrapped with a heavy tow chain, and it appeared the victim had been badly beaten, authorities said. About two years later, a telephone tip led to positive identification of the body as that of Lobanoff. The original investigation ruled out Lobanoff’s husband as a suspect in the murder.

Lobanoff’s body was discovered about 7.5 miles upstream, or east, of where the bodies of two other women, Julie Schossow and Marilyn Putt were found in June and July 1982, according to the District Attorney’s Office.

Schossow and Putt were close friends who worked as blackjack dealers at Harrah’s Casino in South Lake Tahoe. They were last seen during the evening hours of Jan. 12, 1982. Initial information indicated that the women had met some wealthy gamblers and willingly gone with them to the Bay Area for the weekend, authorities said.

Nearly six months later, on June 6, 1982, Putt’s body was discovered in the south fork of the American River, a mile west of Highway 193, an area known as Chili Bar. Her body had been weighted down with chains and binding material, authorities said.

A month later, on July 9, 1982, Schossow’s body also was discovered in the south fork of the American River, about 150 yards from where Putt’s body was found. Investigators determined that both women were victims of homicide.

Anyone with information regarding the cases can call Robert Cosley at 530-903-8468 or email robert.cosley@edcgov.us. Information can remain confidential.

Cathy Locke: 916-321-5287, @lockecathy

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