Health & Medicine

Placer County student tests negative for measles

Democratic senators Richard Pan of Sacramento, at podium, and Ben Allen of Santa Monica, far left, this week introduced legislation that would require students to have up-to-date vaccinations. Friday, Placer County health officials announced that a charter school student suspected of having measles has tested negative for the disease.
Democratic senators Richard Pan of Sacramento, at podium, and Ben Allen of Santa Monica, far left, this week introduced legislation that would require students to have up-to-date vaccinations. Friday, Placer County health officials announced that a charter school student suspected of having measles has tested negative for the disease. The Sacramento Bee

A Placer County student suspected of having measles has tested negative for the disease, public health officials said.

Friday evening’s announcement came after the Harvest Ridge Cooperative Charter School in Rocklin notified parents that one of the school’s students might have the potentially deadly disease.

“While it is a relief to all of us that this particular student did not have measles, we are still concerned about the possibility of the measles outbreak extending into our region,” Dr. Robert Oldham, the county’s public health officer, said in a statement.

Placer County has no confirmed measles cases. Friday, County Superintendent of Schools Gayle Garbolino-Mojica urged parents to “protect their children immediately.”

“Although parents have the right to refuse the vaccination, it is in the best interest of all of our students that we look at the proven ways we can prevent the spread of a highly contagious virus,” Garbolino-Mojica said in Friday’s statement.

Amid nationwide attention on the ongoing measles outbreak, a pair of California state senators this week introduced a bill that would tighten vaccination requirements for students. Also, two members of Congress from California announced legislation Friday that would require vaccinations for children attending Head Start pre-schools across the U.S.

Measles usually begins with fever, coughing, a runny nose and red eyes, followed by a rash that spreads from the face. The disease can be fatal or lead to serious neurological disabilities, officials say.

Call Jim Miller, Bee Capitol Bureau, (916) 326-5521. Follow him on Twitter @jimmiller2.

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