History

Bee lauded in ’35 for series on political corruption

The May 7, 1935, Sacramento Bee front page announces the paper’s winning of the Pulitzer Prize for public service. Pictured on the phone is associate editor Arthur B. Waugh, who wrote the winning series.
The May 7, 1935, Sacramento Bee front page announces the paper’s winning of the Pulitzer Prize for public service. Pictured on the phone is associate editor Arthur B. Waugh, who wrote the winning series. Sacramento Bee file

May 7, 1935: The Sacramento Bee was awarded the Pulitzer prize last night for the most disinterested and meritorious public service performed by an American newspaper during the year 1934.

The award recognizes the work of Arthur B. Waugh, associate editor of The Bee, for his series of stories dealing with political corruption in Nevada in connection with the nomination of Federal District Judge Frank H. Norcross to the United States Circuit Court of Appeals.

This marks the first time a Pulitzer prize for disinterested meritorious public service inaugurated in 1918 has been awarded a California newspaper.

The award to The Sacramento Bee was announced in New York by Dr. Nicholas Murray Butler, president of the Columbia University, at the annual dinner of alumni of the Pulitzer School of Journalism.

The selections are made by an advisory board headed by Dr. Butler and including many outstanding figures in the field of American journalism.

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