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How many people will miss work following the Super Bowl? About 14 million, survey says

Watch the flu spread across the United States

The activity of flu-like illnesses was at high levels in mid-January in 24 states, including California, according to the Centers for Disease Control.
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The activity of flu-like illnesses was at high levels in mid-January in 24 states, including California, according to the Centers for Disease Control.

Football season is over, a champion has been decided and the nation’s biggest sporting event (and non-holiday party occasion) is winding down.

Still, a recent survey says an estimated 14 million Americans need an extra day to rest up and will call out of work Monday, the day after Super Bowl 52, either because they’re sick or they’re “sick.”

A survey commissioned by Mucinex and The Workforce Institute at Kronos, released last week, found that 13.9 million employed adults are likely to call out that day. The same survey last year estimated 16.5 million, according to USA Today.

The findings also state that 19 percent of Americans admit they’ve missed work the day after a Super Bowl, and one-quarter of them think the day should be a recognized holiday. These numbers led cold medicine brand Mucinex to incorporate “#SuperSickMonday” into their marketing campaign.

Of course, not all Monday call-outs will be works of fiction. Mixed population gatherings (aka parties, aka Super Bowl parties) greatly increase the chances of spreading and catching illness, especially considering the devastating flu season that’s plaguing the U.S. And Philadelphia’s upcoming championship parade is sure to spread plenty of germs citywide.

What actions—apart from getting vaccinated and taking medicine—can you take to help slow the spread of illnesses like the flu?

In fact, the rampant H3N2 flu strand might lead to less fake call-outs Monday from workers who have already used up some sick leave – perhaps (but not necessarily) the reason this year’s survey estimates about 2.5 million fewer absences than last year.

And if do plan to fake an illness, do so at your own risk. About one-third of employers said they follow through with their employees to see if they’re really sick, and 22 percent of employers have fired an employee for faking it, according to surveys commissioned by CareerBuilder from 2016. The studies said 35 percent of workers admitted to calling in sick when they felt OK.

And, according to that same set of surveys, Monday is by far the most popular sick day of the week at 48 percent, with the next closest being Friday (26 percent). Coincidence?

Those surveys looked at more than 2,500 human resources managers and more than 3,000 employees.

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