National

‘I’m a victim of sexual assault,’ Trump adviser Kellyanne Conway tells CNN

Kellyanne Conway, an adviser to President Donald Trump, revealed Sunday on CNN’s State of the Union that she’s a survivor of sexual assault.
Kellyanne Conway, an adviser to President Donald Trump, revealed Sunday on CNN’s State of the Union that she’s a survivor of sexual assault. Bloomberg file

Kellyanne Conway, an adviser to President Donald Trump, revealed Sunday on CNN’s “State of the Union” that she’s a survivor of sexual assault, reported The Washington Post.

“I feel very empathetic, frankly, for victims of sexual assault, sexual harassment and rape,” Conway told host Jake Tapper during a discussion on Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh, reported USA Today.

Conway then cleared her throat, reported Time.

“I’m a victim of sexual assault,” she told Tapper, according to the magazine. “I don’t expect Judge Kavanaugh or Jake Tapper or Jeff Flake or anybody to be held responsible for that. You have to be responsible for your own conduct.”

Flake, an Arizona senator, called Friday for a one-week delay to a Senate vote on Kavanaugh’s lifetime appointment to allow an FBI investigation of allegations of sexual assault against him. The Senate, and Trump, later agreed to the delay.

Neither Conway nor Tapper appeared to be prepared for her revelation, the Post reported.

“This is the first time I’ve ever heard you talk about something personal like that, and I’m really sorry,” Tapper replied, according to the publication.

“I’ve just had it,” Conway replied, reported USA Today. Tapper pointed out that Conway works for Trump, who himself has been accused of sexually assaulting numerous women.

“Don’t conflate that with this, and certainly don’t conflate that with what happened to me,” Conway said, according to USA Today.

Conway argued that allegations of sexual assault are viewed differently by the public based on the political affiliations involved, reported The Huffington Post.

“Jake, they should all be heard, and they should be heard in courts of law,” Conway said, according to the site. “They should be heard in depositions. They should be heard in proceedings. Those who can prosecute, those who have civil and/or criminal causes of action, should pursue that.”

“But we do treat people differently who are either the victims or the perpetrators of this based on their politics now and based on their gender,” Conway said, according to The Huffington Post. “That is a huge mistake. America, it’s a huge mistake.”

At the Senate Judiciary Committee hearing Sept. 27, the testimony by Christine Blasey Ford demonstrated great courage. Here, she tells Senator Patrick Leahy that her strongest memory of the incident is "the uproarious laughter … at my expense."

Related stories from Sacramento Bee

  Comments