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This bear got a trip to Dairy Queen. Now her zookeepers are in trouble

Berkley, a 1-year-old bear, got a trip to a Dairy Queen drive-through for ice cream, but keepers at Discovery Wildlife Park in Alberta, Canada, are in trouble for the jaunt, which was captured on video.
Berkley, a 1-year-old bear, got a trip to a Dairy Queen drive-through for ice cream, but keepers at Discovery Wildlife Park in Alberta, Canada, are in trouble for the jaunt, which was captured on video. Discovery Wildlife Park

Berkley’s big day could land her keepers at a private zoo in Alberta, Canada, in big trouble.

Berkley, a 1-year-old Kodiak bear who arrived at Discovery Wildlife Park as an orphan in 2017, took a trip in January to a Dairy Queen to be hand-fed ice cream from the drive-thru window, according to The Guardian.

Keepers captured the whole escapade on video for social media, noting that the Dairy Queen had not yet opened for human customers and that Berkley was secured to a chain inside a truck, the publication reported.

The zoo, located in Innisfail, about 70 miles north of Calgary, has now been charged by the Canadian government with two counts of taking Berkley out of the zoo without informing authorities, reported The Independent.

The first incident took place shortly after Berkley’s arrival from the United States, when keepers took her home at night for bottle feedings without notifying authorities, according to the publication.

“We made a mistake. I’m embarrassed about it,” owner Doug Bos told The Guardian. “Every time we take an animal off the property, we’re supposed to notify Fish and Wildlife, send them an email, and we forgot to do that in both instances.”

Videos of the Dairy Queen jaunt have since been take down from social media. Bos had earlier defended the videos as promoting good behavior around wild bears, reported CBC News.

"The message was: Don't feed the bears. Don't stop on the side of the road. If everybody would listen to the video that's what the message was, don't do this," he said.

But Rob Laidlaw, executive director of Zoocheck, told CBC News that such jaunts are still a bad idea.

"You can have a trained animal, whether it's a bear or a tiger or any number of other creatures, that does something 500 times in a row or 900 times in a row, but that 901st time, there might be a problem," he said.

Placer County deputies responded to a Northstar, North Lake Tahoe home Thursday, May 3, 2018, after a local bear stopped into the kitchen for some food. Deputies chased him away. No reports injuries or property damage.

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