Politics & Government

Truman ended military racial segregation exactly 69 years before Trump's transgender ban

President Harry Truman signed Executive Order No. 9981 on July 26, 1948, which ordered the integration of the U.S. military.
President Harry Truman signed Executive Order No. 9981 on July 26, 1948, which ordered the integration of the U.S. military. AP

President Donald Trump banned transgender people serving in the U.S. military—exactly 69 years after President Harry S. Truman ordered the integration of its institutions.

According to the Harry S. Truman Library and Museum, Truman signed Executive Order No. 9981 on July 26, 1948.

"It is hereby declared to be the policy of the President that there shall be equality of treatment and opportunity for all persons in the armed services without regard to race, color, religion, or national origin," the order stated according to the Harry S. Truman Library and Museum.

It also established the President’s Committee on Equality of Treatment and Opportunity in the Armed Services, which aimed to eliminate bias in the military.

Before the order, African-Americans and other minorities were mostly segregated from their white counterparts and rarely saw combat, according to the National Army Museum.

However, segregation within the military didn’t officially end until 1954, according to Politico.

Sean Spicer, White House press secretary, emphasized the Trump administration's stance that Obama's transgender bathroom directive – requiring public school districts to let transgender students use the bathroom that matched their gender identity

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