Capitol Alert

AM Alert: What happened and where do we go from here?

Albany High School students Lily Hopwood, Lulu Lebowitz and Tanan Javkhlantugs joined thousands of others on a march to the University of California, Berkeley campus Wednesday, Nov. 9, 2016, to protest the presidential election of Donald Trump in Berkeley, Calif.
Albany High School students Lily Hopwood, Lulu Lebowitz and Tanan Javkhlantugs joined thousands of others on a march to the University of California, Berkeley campus Wednesday, Nov. 9, 2016, to protest the presidential election of Donald Trump in Berkeley, Calif. AP

With the shock and disbelief of Election Night wearing off, many Californians are asking themselves: How did this happen and where do we go from here?

Today more than two dozen journalists, politicians, pollsters and pundits will take part in “A Post-Mortem of the 2016 Election,” a day-long conference dissecting the results from Tuesday night.

Guests can expect former Gov. Gray Davis to weigh in on Donald Trump’s unexpected rise to power and the implications for California in a keynote conversation with Sacramento Bee Political Editor Amy Chance, while pollsters like Mark DiCamillo will likely have to answer to the widespread failure of pre-election voter surveys to accurately determine the nation’s pulse.

The Bee’s Jim Miller moderates a talk about legislative and congressional races with Cynthia Bryant, executive director of the California Republican Party, and a bevy of campaign consultants. After lunch Jessica Calefati of CALmatters is set to discuss direct democracy and the money that poured into California’s 17 ballot propositions with two men who ran opposing marijuana campaigns.

The event, sponsored by Capitol Weekly, UC Center, McGeorge Capital Center for Law & Policy and Leadership California Institute, is scheduled to run from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. at 1123 J Street. A reception welcoming new legislators begins after the conference concludes.

VIDEO OF THE DAY: Sacramento Republicans celebrate Donald Trump’s victory.

VILLARAIGOSA’S ALL IN: With the dust still settling on the 2016 presidential race, the 2018 contest to succeed Gov. Jerry Brown is kicking into high gear Thursday, as former Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa is expected to announce his candidacy. Already running are Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom and state Treasurer John Chiang, while billionaire environmentalist Tom Steyer and Republican San Diego Mayor Kevin Faulconer may consider bids. Villaraigosa has appeared to be “all-in” for months. Recently, he told The Bee he wasn’t interested in a cabinet post should Hillary Clinton have won the presidency.

WORTH REPEATING: “At my age, not that many people are like pro-Trump or anything.” - Jackie Suvivuo, Carmichael 12-year-old, describing volunteering at a Trump phone bank on Election Day.

SPEAKER SERIES: Sasha Abramsky, a freelance journalist, author and lecturer in the UC Davis writing program, will explore poverty in California and how it plays out in state politics. His speech, titled “The American Way of Poverty: the role of inequality and perceptions of a stacked economy in shaping modern politics,” is scheduled to begin at noon at the UC Center Sacramento at 11:30 a.m. on K Street.

TOO CLOSE TO CALL: With likely millions of ballots uncounted, official vote tallies are still days, if not weeks away. Stay tuned for updates on key races, such as Sacramento County’s 7th Congressional District, where Rep. Ami Bera, D-Elk Grove, carries a slight lead over his Republican challenger, Sacramento Sheriff Scott Jones, and the 29th Senate District, in which Assemblywoman Ling Ling Chang, R-Diamond Bar is barely edging out Democrat Josh Newman.

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