Capitol Alert

Nancy Pelosi really, really wants your money

‘Historic victory is within our grasp,’ Nancy Pelosi tells California Democratic Party convention

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi speaks to the California Democratic party's annual convention on Feb. 24, 2018 in San Diego.
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House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi speaks to the California Democratic party's annual convention on Feb. 24, 2018 in San Diego.

If you follow a candidate, you get these all the time. They flood your inbox. They irritate you. They get deleted right away.

They are, of course, campaign fund-raising emails.

It's a midterm election year, and candidates across the country are sending out alerts for their supporters to send them money. House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi is going to great lengths to get her message across to voters. Her campaign has sent out 31 messages to supporters in a recent stretch of 30 days to raise money for the Democratic Party cause.

Some notable subject lines:

  • I'm scared
  • I'm worried (please read)
  • This poll isn't good
  • I didn't want to email you today
  • As if it couldn't get worse today
  • A matter of life or death

After asking for "one final plea" at the end of May, the San Francisco Democrat's campaign sent out another email the next day — and five more over the next week. In fairness, one subject line read, "NOT asking for money."

"You’ll notice that we Democrats are highly engaged with our constituents and will continue ensuring they know what is at stake in this election," said Jorge Aguilar, a spokesman for Pelosi's campaign, in a statement.

For Pelosi, the campaign emails serve a larger purpose beyond collecting donations, Aguilar said. They aim to inform voters on important public policy issues going into the general election. Through her campaign alerts, she has advocated for the Obamacare, net neutrality and gay rights.

At the core of the campaign's messaging is a sense of urgency about how Democrats can oppose Republicans. In her emails, she's called for the resignation of EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt, accused Republicans of "trying to pull a fast one on us (Democrats)" and expressed worries about President Donald Trump's rising poll numbers.

Floods of campaign emails are not unusual, and Pelosi's use of them may be the norm, rather than the exception. Still, the emails offer helpful insight into the Democratic Party's messaging ahead of midterms.

"Republicans are relentless in their plots to destroy health care and hand our tax breaks to the ultra wealthy at the expense of Medicare, Medicaid and Social Security," Aguilar said in a statement. "And that is something we will also highlight in our emails."

PRO-IMMIGRANT GROUPS HOLDING RALLY

The U.S. District Court in Sacramento is holding a hearing at 10 a.m. today on the Trump administration's lawsuit challenging parts of California's sanctuary state laws. Pro-immigrant groups will hold a rally at 8:30 a.m. outside the federal courthouse.

INFLUENCER OF THE DAY

How to solve California's housing crisis? Influencers have plenty to say.

"All policy proposals to address this problem are insufficient without one critical element — a dramatic increase in supply at all levels."

-Mike Madrid, Principal of Grassroots Lab

MUST READ: Police say no deal on California bill to restrict their use of force

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