Capitol Alert

Where the Bay Area is booming; Mac Taylor retires; Assemblyman shows off his cattle

Assemblyman Frank Bigelow, R-O’Neals, is bringing several of his Shorthorn cattle to the State Fair. The show will last an hour and feature several of Bigelow’s prized animals.Photo courtesy of Frank Bigelow.
Assemblyman Frank Bigelow, R-O’Neals, is bringing several of his Shorthorn cattle to the State Fair. The show will last an hour and feature several of Bigelow’s prized animals.Photo courtesy of Frank Bigelow.

TRI-VALLEY SEES GROWING ECONOMY

The Tri-Valley region leads the Bay Area in job creation, according to a Bay Area Council Economic Institute analysis published Wednesday. The analysis attributes Tri-Valley job growth over the past 12 years to stronger education and more affordable housing than neighboring Silicon Valley communities.

The Bay Area Council says employment in an area encompassing the cities of Danville, Dublin, Livermore, Pleasanton and San Ramon increased by 35 percent from 2006 to 2016 — four times more than the state’s overall employment growth in the same time period. The job growth largely comes from greater demand in business, science, technology and management services.

The report also presented several problems threatening the region’s “high quality of life,” including aging infrastructure and escalating home prices.

40 YEARS OF ANALYSIS

Mac Taylor will retire in December after 40 years as Legislative Analyst, the Legislative Analyst’s Office announced Wednesday.

Taylor was the fifth person to serve in the position since it was created in 1941.

The nonpartisan government institution is responsible for analyzing the state budget and advising the California Legislature. The Joint Legislative Budget Committee of the California Legislature will appoint the next Legislative Analyst.

CYBER SUMMIT

The Silicon Valley Leadership Group is holding a cybersecurity summit from 7:30 a.m. to noon tomorrow in Santa Clara to help organizations better prepare for future threats. The event will feature a 90-minute hospital cyber attack simulation. Teams will learn how to make quick communications decisions in response to growing online threats.

CATTLE CALL

Holy cow! Assemblyman Frank Bigelow, R-O’Neals, is bringing several of his Shorthorn cattle to the State Fair at 10 a.m. today. The show will last an hour and feature several of Bigelow’s prized animals.

He said his family has been in the industry for more than a hundred years and enjoys going to the fair to sell cattle. He added that his show offers fun for kids who aren’t intimidated by some of his farm’s larger animals. “The older ones are the ones that are OK for pictures,” Bigelow said of his cows. “They’re like ‘OK, come and pet, I’m good with it.’”

FEDERAL COURT TO HEAR PLANNED PARENTHOOD CASE

As part of an ongoing lawsuit between Planned Parenthood and antiabortion activists, a federal court will hold a hearing today over whether Planned Parenthood should provide documents detailing much of its revenues and expenses for fetal tissue procurement. The abortion provider claims that questions about invoices are irrelevant to its case against David Daleiden, an alleged co-conspirator charged last year for falsifying his identity and using a fake bioresearch company to covertly record videos of attempts to obtain fetal tissue from Planned Parenthood.

BECERRA REMAINS ON BALLOT

Attorney General Xavier Becerra won a legal challenge on Wednesday surrounding his re-election campaign. The Superior Court of California denied a petition from Eric Early, an unsuccessful Republican primary candidate, alleging Becerra did not meet eligibility requirements to remain on the ballot. In a statement, Becerra’s campaign manager called the petition “frivolous” and praised the judge’s decision.

INFLUENCER OF THE DAY

From ‘secure our borders’ to ‘resist Trump’: California Influencers speak out on illegal immigration

“Our current federal immigration policies are a disaster, and there should be universal agreement across the political spectrum on that point. The states play a minor role in immigration policy, which is largely preempted by federal law. California politicians can best serve their constituents by climbing down from their soap boxes and stop pretending that they can actually solve the immigration problem. Their best course would be to lower their rhetoric from the wild extremism on both sides and restore a civil debate on a serious national problem that needs immediate addressing for economic, moral and social imperatives.”

— Sal Russo, Co-founder of Tea Party Express

MUST-READ: What John Cox doesn’t want to talk about in his race for California governor

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