Capitol Alert

Starving students; Capitol Weekly sets Top 100 date; Influencers on sanctuary state

STUDENT STRUGGLES

The Assembly Speaker’s Office of Research and Floor Analysis released a report Monday about hunger and homelessness issues among UC, CSU and CCC college students.

  • One in four community college students experienced homelessness in recent years.

  • 42 percent of CSU students lacked reliable access to affordable food, and 11 percent were homeless in the past year.
  • In 2016, 5 percent of UC undergraduates were homeless while attending school, and nearly half of undergrads were food insecure.
  • Housing is the biggest expense for UC students living off campus.

The report recommends colleges block out orientation and academic counseling time to connect students with programs like CalFresh, which provides food assistance for low-income people. The report also urges schools to provide short-term emergency housing options for homeless students, either through campus housing or by partnering with off-site hotels and motels.

FREE AGENT

Anthony Reyes is calling himself a free agent after joining the Edelman public relations firm’s Sacramento office in March. In a Facebook post, the former communications director for Kevin de León said he’s ”doing my own communications consulting and PR thing for a little while” and welcomed ideas for new opportunities.

CAPITOL WEEKLY SETS RELEASE DATE FOR ANNUAL TOP 100 LIST

In exactly three weeks, Capitol Weekly will unveil its annual list of 100 most powerful people influencing California politics. The Top 100 Party will be held from 5:30-7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Aug. 14 at the Sutter Club in Sacramento. Tickets are now available for $100.

IMMIGRANT ID IMPACT

Alana LeBrón, assistant professor of Chicano/Latino studies at UC Irvine, will discuss how ID policies affect the health of Latino immigrant communities at noon tomorrow at UC Center Sacramento.

INFLUENCER OF THE DAY

Keep fighting or fold to Trump? California Influencers speak out on sanctuary state posture.

“California should not provide a safe harbor for people who commit crimes — whether those people are in our state legally or illegally. The sanctuary state policy has done nothing other than to polarize people even further and contribute to the delays in passing substantive reform at the federal level.”

Kristin Olsen, Stanislaus County supervisor

MUST-READ: Keep fighting or fold to Trump? California leaders split on sanctuary state

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