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Gavin Newsom winning the money race over John Cox

In primary victory speech, Newsom frames the California governor race as a fight with Trump

Gavin Newsom, after winning the primary for California governor, hit on major platform issues. He calls out Attorney General Jeff Sessions and declares California is "a state where we don't criminalize diversity, we celebrate diversity."
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Gavin Newsom, after winning the primary for California governor, hit on major platform issues. He calls out Attorney General Jeff Sessions and declares California is "a state where we don't criminalize diversity, we celebrate diversity."

In the battle to succeed Gov. Jerry Brown this November, Democrat Gavin Newsom is trouncing his Republican opponent, John Cox, in campaign fundraising, according to campaign finance reports filed with the state late Wednesday.

Newsom raised $6.3 million from May 20 through June 30, a span that covers the primary contest in which Newsom and Cox advanced with 33.7 percent and 25.4 percent of the vote, respectively.

Cox raised $2.5 million over the same period. Much of that — $1.1 million — is from his own pocket. He has raised $1.6 million from donors since finishing second in the June 5 primary.

In the first half of the year, from January through June, Newsom far outraised Cox, taking in $12.5 million. Cox has raised $4.7 million this year.

Cox is the primary financier of his campaign. So far this election cycle, Cox has contributed $5.2 million of his own money to himself, according to state campaign finance filings.

Cox has $1.5 million remaining in the bank. Newsom has $11.1 million in cash on hand.

It’s yet another indication of the difficulties Cox is facing as he tries to gain political momentum ahead of November. He remains consistently behind Newsom by double digits in public opinion polling. Newsom is favored by 55 percent of likely voters, compared to 31 percent for Cox, according to the latest results from the Public Policy Institute of California survey.

Among Newsom’s major campaign contributors are unions, Silicon Valley tech executives, the agricultural industry and health insurers. Notable donors who have given Newsom large campaign contributions include Michael Bloomberg, the billionaire former mayor of New York City; actor Sean Penn; Bill Maher, host of HBO’s “Real Time with Bill Maher”; Netflix CEO Reed Hastings and Los Angeles philanthropist Eli Broad.

Hastings and Broad are among the charter schools advocates who backed Antonio Villaraigosa over Newsom in the primary election. They were behind an independent campaign committee that spent $23 million trying to defeat Newsom, but now are giving money to him. Villaraigosa, the former mayor of Los Angeles, endorsed Newsom after conceding the primary.

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