Capitol Alert

Will Tom Steyer run for president? + Kamala Harris releases book

Tom Steyer: Congress refusing to take stand on impeaching Trump

Tom Steyer, founder of Need to Impeach, says Congress isn't doing its job in overseeing President Donald Trump. He is calling for impeachment, which is creating a rift within the Democratic Party.
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Tom Steyer, founder of Need to Impeach, says Congress isn't doing its job in overseeing President Donald Trump. He is calling for impeachment, which is creating a rift within the Democratic Party.

We have a new cello-playing intern inside our Capitol bureau. Please join me in welcoming Maddy Ashmun, who will be staying with us through March 22. She has a background in radio and is studying journalism at Northwestern University. You can email her at mashmun@sacbee.com.

JUST TELL US ALREADY

Maddy writes...

To run or not to run? That is the question.

Tom Steyer, the liberal billionaire activist you’ve seen on TV calling for President Donald Trump’s impeachment, will announce his 2019 political plans on Wednesday in Des Moines.

Steyer is holding a town hall to discuss education as a part of his “5 Rights” platform. At the town hall, he will also answer questions about “his plans for the future and his vision for the country,” according to a news release.

The statement fuels speculation about whether he will enter the 2020 presidential race, joining a field of Democratic contenders that includes Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren.

Steyer has contemplated runs for political office in the past, most recently weighing a campaign against Sen. Dianne Feinstein in 2017. The event will begin at 1:30 p.m.

KAMALA HARRIS BOOK

Alexei Koseff reports...

Larry Wallace, the former close aide to U.S. Sen. Kamala Harris who resigned last month after The Bee inquired about a settlement involving his alleged workplace misconduct, merits a brief mention in her new book.

“The Truths We Hold,” which recounts Harris’ life and political ideology, was released Tuesday, as Harris gears up for an expected presidential campaign.

In a chapter about her positions on criminal justice issues, Harris writes that Wallace led her initiative to institute implicit bias training for police officers when she was California attorney general. Wallace, who was the chief of the California Department of Justice law enforcement division at the time, helped develop a curriculum about unconscious judgment of suspects that could be adopted by law enforcement agencies across the state.

A picture later in the book shows Wallace joined Harris for an undated trip to Mexico City to collaborate with Mexican law enforcement on combating transnational crime. The Washington Free Beacon first reported on the Wallace mentions.

Wallace was accused by his former executive assistant in December 2016 of “gender harassment” and other demeaning behavior. She complained that Wallace frequently asked her to crawl under his desk in dresses and skirts to change the paper in his printer and refused to move the printer when she asked.

A lawsuit against the Department of Justice was filed just days before Harris was sworn into the Senate and settled less than five months later for $400,000. Harris has said she had no idea about the complaint and settlement until The Bee asked about it, though Wallace had been one of her closest professional confidantes since she was the San Francisco district attorney.

“I’m frustrated that I wasn’t briefed,” Harris told The Bee in December, after accepting Wallace’s resignation. “That’s what makes me upset about this. There’s no question I should have been informed about this. There’s no question. And there were ample opportunities when I could have been informed.”

TWEET OF THE DAY

Mike Madrid (@“madrid_mike) — “This is the Republican Party I joined. Tonight Donald Trump will alienate an entire generation of young Latinos. If you can’t figure out why - keep watching this video until it breaks through your thick skull, hardened heart and lost sense of our American identity.”

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