Capitol Alert

Buying ammunition in California? It’s about to get more expensive. Here’s why.

Gun dealer describes confusion, complexity in California’s new gun laws

California lawmakers and voters passed a slew of new gun and ammunition laws in 2016 that will significantly affect the state’s more than 6 million firearms owners. Gun dealers say the overlapping laws have created confusion.
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California lawmakers and voters passed a slew of new gun and ammunition laws in 2016 that will significantly affect the state’s more than 6 million firearms owners. Gun dealers say the overlapping laws have created confusion.

This July, it will get more expensive to purchase firearm ammunition in California.

That’s because the second phase of 2016’s Proposition 63 goes into effect, mandating that all ammunition buyers submit to a spot background check when purchasing rounds, at the cost of $1.

Under the new gun control law, ammunition dealers must check the buyer’s ID information against data in the state’s Automated Firearms System; the check is designed to quickly return information on whether the buyer has any restrictions against making such a purchase, such as a felony conviction.

The law also prohibits the sale of ammunition to non-California residents, according to LAX Ammunition, an ammunition supply store that released a Frequently Asked Questions document about the new law.

The law does not limit the amount of ammunition that may be sold.

A federal judge struck down the other part of Prop 63, which restricted the size of the firearm magazines.

U.S. District Court Judge Roger T. Benitez declared in a fiery 86-page ruling that the right to carry high-capacity firearm magazines was enshrined by “colonists who cherished individual freedom more than the subservient security of a British ruler.”

That order has since been stayed while the matter is considered for appeal.

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