Capitol Alert

AM Alert: With deadline up, remembering the bills that won’t get a vote

Kari Hess, left, co-owner of Nor Cal Vape, in Redding, Calif., celebrates with Jackie Voisione, center, and Michael Ventura, right, an e-liquid manufacturer from San Diego, after a bill to regulate E-Cigarettes stalled in an Assembly Committee.
Kari Hess, left, co-owner of Nor Cal Vape, in Redding, Calif., celebrates with Jackie Voisione, center, and Michael Ventura, right, an e-liquid manufacturer from San Diego, after a bill to regulate E-Cigarettes stalled in an Assembly Committee. AP

Editor’s note: An earlier version of this post incorrectly described the status of AB 69, which requires agencies to consider best practices for the privacy and security of the recordings from body cameras. The bill passed in the Senate Committee on Public Safety and will be heard next in the Senate Appropriations Committee.

With the deadline for policy committees to send bills out for floor-session votes passing today (and with no policy committees meeting before the day ends), proposals that haven’t yet escaped the process are now dead, barring some procedural jujitsu.

The committee process brought down some major legislation this session, either with a vote or without one.

Bills that tried to specify the way police could use body cameras are now dead, including Assembly Bill 66, which in its first version prohibited officers from reviewing body camera footage before making a report.

Two tobacco proposals, one that would have raised the minimum age to buy tobacco products and one that would have classified e-cigarettes the same way as conventional cigarettes, failed to make it out of committee on the same day. The author of the first decided not to put his bill up for a hearing, and the second was torpedoed with an unfriendly amendment.

But the proposals both have been resurrected in the special session.

OVER THE WEEKEND: Sonoma Developmental Center in Eldridge, an inpatient hospital for people with developmental disabilities, has been heading for the Department of Developmental Services’ chopping block since the governor signed legislation to close places like it in June. Senate Bill 82 required DDS to plan to close at least one of their three centers. At a hearing Saturday, the department will take comments on its plan to close Sonoma by the end of 2018. That plan will still need to go to the Legislature.

The hearing is at 10 a.m. at the Sonoma Valley High School Pavilion.

WORKING VACATION: A couple of legislators are getting started already with constituent events. Sen. Jim Beall (D-San Jose) is hosting a coffee-and-conversation event, and Assembly Speaker Toni Atkins will speak at San Diego’s 40th Spirit of Stonewall Rally, an LGBT pride event.

CELEBRATION: Assemblymember Chris Holden, D-Pasadena, is 55 Sunday.

Andrew Holzman: 916-326-5545, @andrewlholzman

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