The State Worker

Heavy rains put Sacramento tax board staff on leak alert

Falling glass at California tax board building nearly hits pedestrian

In 2012, security cameras capture a pedestrian walking near the California Board Of Equalization's troubled skyscraper in downtown Sacramento nearly hit by falling glass from a panel that crashed to the ground.
Up Next
In 2012, security cameras capture a pedestrian walking near the California Board Of Equalization's troubled skyscraper in downtown Sacramento nearly hit by falling glass from a panel that crashed to the ground.

Heavy rain may be great for relieving California’s epic drought, but not so great for its 24-story money pit, the Board of Equalization building.

Employees at the downtown Sacramento highrise found out this week that it had sprung a leak on the 10th floor and another on the 22nd during the last round of rain. The source of the leaks, according to the employee email from BOE Deputy Director Edna Murphy, was still being determined.

Both floors have a history of troubles, from leaks and noxious odors to concerns over toxic chemicals present in floor tiles. From 2008 through 2012, according to the board’s online running tally, the two floors were the subject of 23 reports or actions to fix or monitor concerns.

1992The year that construction on the BOE tower finished

And, of course, the entire building has logged bouts with mold, faulty elevators, bats, corroded wastewater pipes and exterior glass panels that pop off and crash to the ground. (A panel fell in 2012, which is why the building has scaffolding at its base and its parking garage’s top level to protect pedestrians and employees.)

“Given the extent of recent storms the building may have experienced other water leaks,” Murphy cautioned employees in her Wednesday letter. “If you see a ceiling tile that is stained or water leaks are noted in the building, please be sure that you advise your supervisor of that event as a Building Maintenance issue and submit a BOE 1080 Work Request Form so the DGS is advised of the leak.”

Taxpayers have spent around $60 million to make repairs on the 24-year-old tower, which is located at 450 N St. Tens of millions of dollars more to fix the plumbing, replace the outside glass panels and other work remains to be done.

  Comments