California Forum

California will be even more incredible if we secede

Marcus Ruiz Evans, center, of The Yes California Independence Campaign, talks to passers-by about California seceding from the United States and becoming its own nation in Sacramento in 2016.
Marcus Ruiz Evans, center, of The Yes California Independence Campaign, talks to passers-by about California seceding from the United States and becoming its own nation in Sacramento in 2016. AP file

California is a great, big, beautiful, wonderful, incredible, super-spectacular state not just until, but even when some random calamity strikes.

Ben Boychuk is right. (“Secession 2020? Sigh. Here’s why it shouldn’t happen even if it makes the ballot,” Forum, April 26.) An earthquake may destroy a major traffic artery and a devastating wildfire may wipe out half of Napa Valley.

The United States claims to be the freest country in the world. We ought to enjoy the fundamental right of self-determination, and if we so determine, self-rule.

But these tragic events cannot take away from the beauty, nor the wonder, of California. And when somebody decides the state should secede, it is not a calamity. Secession is an opportunity.

A pipe dream? A pie in the sky?

No, these deal with impossible goals. Secession is possible. Will it be an uphill battle? Sure. A Herculean task? Maybe. But here’s where you’re wrong: The Civil War did not settle this issue and nowhere in the Constitution, nor in Texas v. White, nor any subsequent court ruling does it say a “supermajority” of states must provide consent.

There are three possible thresholds that could constitute the “consent of the states” required to secede under federal law: unanimous consent (all the states), a supermajority, (two-thirds of the states), or a simply majority (half of the states).

If California was admitted into the Union by a simple majority vote (as it was), under what basis would a supermajority be required for her to exit?

I contend a simple majority establishes this consent, but would this vote take place in Congress or in state legislatures? These questions remain unanswered, but can you think of 25 red states that might like to see blue California secede? I can think of 30 that voted for Donald Trump.

Look, the United States claims to be the freest country in the world. We ought to enjoy the fundamental right of self-determination, and if we so determine, self-rule.

Then California can sign a military base agreement with the Americans to lease land for their existing bases. California will not be hostile towards them, but our immigrants will be protected from them.

Additionally, by keeping the tens (sometimes hundreds) of billions of dollars we lose each year supporting red states that hate California, we will reduce our debts, fund our liabilities, and provide every Californian with a debt-free college education and universal healthcare.

Yes, California is incredible. But just wait until we are independent.

Louis Marinelli is a co-author of the Calexit initiative. Reach him at @LouisJMarinelli.

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