Portions of the two largest north-south water delivery systems in California run side-by-side near Patterson, Stanislaus County.  In the foreground is the Edmund G. Brown California Aquaduct (State Water Project) and behind it is the Delta-Mendota Canal, part of the (Federal) Central Valley Project.  The power -- and availibility--  of water turns an arid, desert-like landscape into lush, growing farmlands in California’s great central valley... “food grows where water flows”.  Photo taken June 13, 2002.  Dick Schmidt /  The Sacramento Bee (with story by Dale Kasler)
Portions of the two largest north-south water delivery systems in California run side-by-side near Patterson, Stanislaus County. In the foreground is the Edmund G. Brown California Aquaduct (State Water Project) and behind it is the Delta-Mendota Canal, part of the (Federal) Central Valley Project. The power -- and availibility-- of water turns an arid, desert-like landscape into lush, growing farmlands in California’s great central valley... “food grows where water flows”. Photo taken June 13, 2002. Dick Schmidt / The Sacramento Bee (with story by Dale Kasler) Dick Schmidt Sacramento Bee Staff Photo
Portions of the two largest north-south water delivery systems in California run side-by-side near Patterson, Stanislaus County. In the foreground is the Edmund G. Brown California Aquaduct (State Water Project) and behind it is the Delta-Mendota Canal, part of the (Federal) Central Valley Project. The power -- and availibility-- of water turns an arid, desert-like landscape into lush, growing farmlands in California’s great central valley... “food grows where water flows”. Photo taken June 13, 2002. Dick Schmidt / The Sacramento Bee (with story by Dale Kasler) Dick Schmidt Sacramento Bee Staff Photo