Portions of the two largest north-south water delivery systems in California run side-by-side near Patterson, Stanislaus County.  In the foreground is the Edmund G. Brown California Aquaduct (State Water Project) and behind it is the Delta-Mendota Canal, part of the (Federal) Central Valley Project.  The power -- and availibility--  of water turns an arid, desert-like landscape into lush, growing farmlands in California’s great central valley... “food grows where water flows”.  Photo taken June 13, 2002.  Dick Schmidt /  The Sacramento Bee (with story by Dale Kasler)
Portions of the two largest north-south water delivery systems in California run side-by-side near Patterson, Stanislaus County. In the foreground is the Edmund G. Brown California Aquaduct (State Water Project) and behind it is the Delta-Mendota Canal, part of the (Federal) Central Valley Project. The power -- and availibility-- of water turns an arid, desert-like landscape into lush, growing farmlands in California’s great central valley... “food grows where water flows”. Photo taken June 13, 2002. Dick Schmidt / The Sacramento Bee (with story by Dale Kasler) Dick Schmidt Sacramento Bee Staff Photo
Portions of the two largest north-south water delivery systems in California run side-by-side near Patterson, Stanislaus County. In the foreground is the Edmund G. Brown California Aquaduct (State Water Project) and behind it is the Delta-Mendota Canal, part of the (Federal) Central Valley Project. The power -- and availibility-- of water turns an arid, desert-like landscape into lush, growing farmlands in California’s great central valley... “food grows where water flows”. Photo taken June 13, 2002. Dick Schmidt / The Sacramento Bee (with story by Dale Kasler) Dick Schmidt Sacramento Bee Staff Photo

Jerry Brown has months to complete his father’s legacy on water. He just might succeed.

July 29, 2018 12:01 AM