Editorials

Yosemite climb a remarkable feat of fingers and feet

Tommy Caldwell, left, and Kevin Jorgeson, with El Capitan in the background, reached the top of the granite monolith Wednesday afternoon after 19 days of free-climbing the Dawn Wall. They reached a height of about 3,000 feet above Yosemite Valley in their never-before-attempted feat.
Tommy Caldwell, left, and Kevin Jorgeson, with El Capitan in the background, reached the top of the granite monolith Wednesday afternoon after 19 days of free-climbing the Dawn Wall. They reached a height of about 3,000 feet above Yosemite Valley in their never-before-attempted feat. The Fresno Bee

When climbers Tommy Caldwell and Kevin Jorgeson reached the top of El Capitan’s Dawn Wall on Wednesday after a grueling 19-day journey straight up, a small group of friends and family let out their collective breaths. So did untold watchers across the globe.

The two climbers had been the stars of the ultimate sports reality show ever since they put fingers to rock and began an outrageously ambitious ascent of a 3,000-foot granite face using only the strength of their hands and feet. It was widely considered the toughest free climb ever undertaken.

They had ropes, of course – they were ambitious, not suicidal – but they didn’t use them to climb, just to move equipment and to keep from plunging to their deaths if they fell. And they did fall, many times; even so, they kept going on and up.

We’ll never know the levels of despair, euphoria, exhaustion and cold these two endured during the long days and longer nights clinging to a rock wall. We do know, however, that it took amazing reserves of patience, humility, persistence, confidence and skill to accomplish this feat.

What’s even more impressive is that Caldwell and Jorgeson took on this challenge not for public attention or movie deals but because, as rock climbers, this was their Everest.

“This isn’t about conquering, this isn’t about us vs. it, ” Jorgeson said Thursday, as The Fresno Bee’s Carmen George reported. “It comes back to that inspiration, that dream of seeing something through.”

Who wouldn’t want their kids to embody this kind of determination and spirit?

This is also a lesson about hard work paying off, not about engaging in extreme and risky behavior. These men knew precisely what they were doing and relied on years of training and a lifetime of technical skill. The concern about any high-profile accomplishment is that other people, less prepared people, will get hurt or die trying.

There’s really nothing stopping anyone with a rope, or without, from attempting the same climb. The National Park Service says there is no permit or training required to rock climb in the national parks or monuments. It’s understandable; it’s not the responsibility of the parks to stop people from doing foolish things to themselves. As it is, Yosemite has more than 100 climbing accidents every year and as many as a quarter require rescues.

Let’s hope that this remarkable climb inspires people to new personal heights, if not actual ones.

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